Colombia

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Colombia — forget the reputation. Twice the size of France, and with a diversity of landscapes and cultures that would be hard to find even in countries five times its size, Colombia should by all rights be one of the world's top travel destinations. Pick a climate, and it's yours—if you find the light jacket weather of Bogotá cold, drive an hour down through the mountains and sunbathe next to the pool of your rented hacienda. If you don't want to sit still, head off into the Amazon or any of the country's other many inland jungles, snow-capped volcanoes, rocky deserts, endless plains, lush valleys, coffee plantations, alpine lakes, deserted beaches. For culture, intellectual Bogotá might lead the rest of Latin America in experimental theater, indie-rock, and just sheer volume of bookstores, but you could also get a completely alien education in an Amazonian malocca, or you could delve into the huge Latin music scene of salsa and cumbia, with the most exciting dance display being the enormous Carnival of Barranquilla. For history, wander the narrow streets of South America's original capital in Bogotá, check out old Spanish colonial provincial retreats like Villa de Leyva, trek through the thick jungle-covered mountains of the northeast to the Lost City of the Tayrona Indians. Walk the walls of Cartagena's achingly beautiful old city, looking over the fortified ramparts upon which the colonial history of South America pivoted. For nightlife, hot Cali is today's world capital of salsa, claiming that competitive distinction even over Colombia's other vibrant big city party scenes, which keep the music going long into the small hours of the morning. For dining, you'll find everything from the ubiquitous cheap, delicious Colombian home-style meals to world-class upscale and modern culinary arts in the big cities, with cuisines from all corners of the world represented. And for relaxing, there are gorgeous tropical beaches along Colombia's Caribbean and Pacific coasts, but you can find even more laidback and peaceful retreats on the idyllic and unspoilt Caribbean island of Providencia. The political violence has subsided substantially throughout the majority of the country and savvy travelers have already flocked here from around the world—come before everyone else catches on! (less...) (more...)

Population: 45,745,783 people
Area: 1,138,910 km2
Highest point: 5,775 m
Coastline: 3,208 km
Life expectancy: 75.02 years
GDP per capita: $11,000
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About Colombia

History

Colombia was originally inhabited by numerous, major indigenous cultures like the Muisca and the Tayrona. The area that now is Colombia was colonised by the Spanish when America was discovered by Europeans. The process of colonisation radically altered the social structures of the areas and through war and disease brought by the Spanish, the indigenous populations shrank dramatically in size and their numbers dwindle since then. The Spanish brought European settlers and African slaves, while most of the population in the colony was of mixed Spanish and Indigenous ancestry.

The country became independent from Spain in 1810. It was one of the five countries liberated by Simón Bolívar (the others being Ecuador, Venezuela, Peru and Bolivia). Colombia, Ecuador, Venezuela, and Panama then formed the first Republic of Colombia. Ecuador and Venezuela declared their independence from Colombia in 1830. Panama declared its independence from Colombia in 1903.

The history of the country in the years to come following independence was marked by several civil wars. The legacy of these conflicts, together with troublesome social issues, early state repression against rural communities and peasants, and world polarisation caused by the Cold War culminated in a communist insurgent campaign by the FARC and the ELN to overthrow the Colombian Government. The years during the conflict were marked by heavy fighting between the communist guerrillas, the Colombian state and military, right-wing paramilitaries, and several drug cartels.

In the years following 2002 safety has improved dramatically throughout most of the country. In 2012 the government and the FARC started peace talks aiming at bringing the 50 year old Civil War to an end once and for all. Colombia is currently in a process of recovery, and is creating a thriving economy attractive to many national and international investors. Ending the conflict; reducing high income inequalities; rebuilding itself from the legacy of war; these are all some of the issues that confront the country.

Climate

Take your pick, really. Colombia is an equatorial country with amazing variance in altitude, so it's going to be pretty whatever temperature you like best all year long somewhere! The climate is tropical along the coast, eastern plains, and Amazon; cold in the highlands with periodic droughts. Lacking the usual seasons, Colombians normally refer to rainy seasons as winter—but the differences in terrain and altitude mean the rainy seasons are different in every corner of the country!

The one downside to all this climactic diversity, though, is that you'll have to bring a fair amount of different clothes if you plan to travel extensively. Cities in the center like Bogotá and those to the north in Boyacá can potentially reach temperatures below 0° Celsius, so bring a coat. Some mountains are also covered in snow year-long. Cities along the Caribbean coast like Cartagena, Barranquilla, and Santa Marta are hot and humid, while some cities at mid-altitude in the Andes like Medellín (the City of Eternal Spring), Manizales, and other cities in the Coffee Triangle region have beautiful temperate weather always.

Activities

There are a lot of things to do in Colombia, and you can find parties and celebrations wherever you go. Colombians especially love to dance, and if you don't know how, they'll happily teach you. Colombia is known for its exciting night life.

There are many groups and agencies offering eco-tourism and it is very usual to find trekking plans (locally named 'caminatas' or 'excursiones') on weekend; many groups (named 'caminantes') offers cheaper one day excursion, special trips (on long weekends or during periods of vacation time (January, Holy Week, July, August, October, December) to different places in the country. Some recommended groups based out of Bogotá are: Viajar y Vivir, Fundación Sal Si Puedes, Caminantes del Retorno; there are many other. Patianchos in Medellín; Rastros in Bucaramanga. They usually offer guidance and transportation to the place; on long trips include lodging and other services. The recommendation is asking if the guide has the official certification.

Food

In many areas of Colombia, it is common to have buñuelos (deep fried corn flour balls with cheese in the dough) and arepas (rather thick corn tortillas, often made with cheese and served with butter) with scrambled eggs for breakfast. Bogotá and the central region have its own breakfast delicacy of tamales - maize and chopped pork or chicken with vegetables and eggs, steamed in banana leaves, often served with home-made hot chocolate.

Empanadas, made with potato and meat with a pouch-like yellow exterior, are delicious and entirely different from their Mexican counterparts. Pastry is prevalent, both salty and sweet, including Pandebono, Pan de Yuca, Pastel Gloria, and Roscon. These vary in quality—ask the locals for the best niche places to indulge.

For lunch, especially on Sundays, you should try a sancocho de gallina (rich chicken soup, served with part of the chicken itself, rice and vegetables/salad). Sancocho is widespread throughout the country, with countless regional variants. On the coast it features fish, and is highly recommended. Another soup, served in Bogotá and the periphery, is Ajiaco (chicken soup made with three different kinds of potato, vegetables and herbs(guasca), served with rice, avocado, corn, milk cream and capers).

"Bandeja paisa" is common in most places, (the "paisas" are the natives from some departments in the northwest, such as Antioquia, Caldas, Risaralda and Quindío). This includes rice, beans, fried plantain, arepa, fried egg, chorizo, chicharrón (pork crackling) with the meat still attached. It's a very fatty dish, but you can leave what you don't like, and if you're lucky enough, you could find a gourmet bandeja paisa in a good restaurant in Bogotá or Medellín. They are lighter and smaller.

There are a few chains throughout the country. In addition to worldwide franchises (McDonald's, Subway, T.G.I.F., which are specially focused on Bogotá and other big cities), Colombian chains are very strong and located in almost every city. Presto and especially El Corral serve outstanding burgers, Kokoriko makes broiled chicken and Frisby specializes in roasted chicken. Gokela is the first choice among people wanting healthy options such as wraps, salads, super foods, supplements and subsequently one of the only options for vegetarians, vegans and organic eaters. Crêpes and Waffles, as the name indicates, is an upscale breakfast/brunch restaurant with spectacular... crêpes, waffles and ice cream. There are many international restaurants, including rodizios (Brazilian steak house style), paella houses, etc.

A great variety of tropical fruits can be tasted, and the corresponding variety in juices, from some of the oddest ones you can find around the globe (really) to the sweetest ones. You just must know how to find and prepare them. Anyway, anyone would be pleased to teach you. Some examples of those exotic fruits include: tamarinds, mangoes, guanabanas, lulo, mangostines (really great and rare even for Colombians), and a great variety in citrus. In addition, you can find some of those rich and strange flavors in prepared food like ice cream brands or restaurant juices. Most of Colombians drink juices at home and in restaurants, they are inexpensive and natural everywhere.

In Colombia there are a great variety of "tamales" if you like them, but be aware they are very different from their most famous Mexican cousins. They differ from region to region, but all of them are delicious. They are called "envuelto", the sweet tamale made of corn.

Regarding coffee, you can find a lot of products that are both made commercially and home-made from this very famous Colombian product, like wines, cookies, candies, milk-based desserts like "arequipe", ice-cream, etc.

Colombians are famous for having a sweet tooth, so you are going to find a lot of desserts and local candies like "bocadillo" made of guayaba (guava fruit), or the most famous milk-based "arequipe" (similar to its Argentinian cousin "dulce leche" or the French "confiteure du lait"). That just covers the basics, since every region in Colombia has its own fruits, local products, and therefore its own range of sweet products. If you are a lover of rare candies, you could get artisan-made candies in the little towns near Bogotá and Tunja.

The "tres leches" cake is not to be missed - a sponge cake soaked in milk, covered in whipped cream, then served with condensed milk, it is for the serious dairy fiend only. Another delicious dessert is 'leche asada', like a grilled milk.

Organic food is a current trend in big cities, but in little towns you can get fruits and veggies all very natural and fresh. Colombians aren't used to storing food for the winter, since there are no seasons in the traditional sense. So don't ask them for dried items like dried tomatoes or fruits. All you have to do is go shopping at the little grocery stores nearby and pick up the freshest of the harvest of the month (almost everything is available and fresh all year). As for pickles and related preserved food, you can find them in supermarkets, but they are not common in family households.

Pre-Columbian civilizations cultivated about 200 varieties of potatoes. Colombia as an Andean country, is not the exception. Even McDonalds recognizes the quality of this product and buys them. Try the local preparations like "papas saladas" (salted potatoes) or "papas chorriadas" (stewed potatoes).

All in all, in Colombia it can be fun to have the ingredients and the preparation of a lot of exotic recipes explained to you.

Drinks

For breakfast, take a home-made hot drink. The choices normally include coffee, hot chocolate or "agua de panela". The latter is a drink prepared with panela (dried cane juice), sometimes with cinnamon and cloves, which gives it a special taste. In Bogotá and the region around, is a custom to use cheese along with the drink, in a way that small pieces of cheese are put into the cup and then after they are melt, you can use a spoon to pick them up and eat it like a soup. It is the same way to drink hot chocolate.

Colombia's national alcoholic beverage, Aguardiente (A.K.A. guaro), tastes strongly of anise, and is typically bought by the bottle or half bottle or a quarter. People usually drink it in shots. Each region has its own aguardiente, "Antioqueño" (from Antioquia), "Cristal" (from Caldas), "Quindiano" (from Quindío), "Blanco del Valle" (from Valle del Cauca) and "Nectar" (from Cundinamarca). There is also a variety of rum beverages, like "Ron Santa Fe" (also from Cundinamarca), "Ron Medellin Añejo" (also from Antioquia), "Ron Viejo de Caldas" (also from Caldas) among others.

The water is drinkable right from the tap in most of the major cities, but be prepared to buy some bottles if you go to the countryside. Agua Manantial Bottled water is recommended, it comes from a natural spring near Bogotá. An advice, make sure you do not use ice cubes, or drink any beverage that might contain non distilled water, ask if the beverage is made with tap or bottled/boiled water.

If you are lucky enough, and if you are staying in a familiar "finca cafetera" (coffee farm) you can ask your Colombian friends not only for the selected coffee (quality export) but for the remaining coffee that the farmers leave to their own use. This is manually picked, washed, toasted in rustic brick stoves and manually ground. It has the most exquisite and rare flavor and aroma ever found.

In Bogota and the rest of the country, black filter coffee is referred to as "tinto" - confusing if you were expecting red wine.

Also, you can find specialized places where you can drink coffee with many different combinations (like Juan Valdés Café or Oma), hot or frozen preparations.

Commercially, you can find a lot of products made out of coffee too like wines, ice-creams, soda-pops and other beverages.

Shopping

The Colombian textile industry is well-recognized and reputable around South America and Europe. Clothing, including lingerie is particularly well-regarded as high quality and very affordable. Leather garments, shoes and accessories are also of interest to foreigners. The best place to buy either is Medellin, known for being the fashion capital of the country, where one can buy very high quality goods at a very low cost.

Colombian emeralds and gold (18k) jewelry can also be very attractive for visitors. A typical Colombian style of jewelry is a copy of precolombian jewelry, which is fabricated with gold, silver and semi-precious stones.

The "mochila", the Spanish word for "backpack" or "rucksack", is also a traditional, indigenous, hand-woven Colombian bag, normally worn over the shoulder. They are commonly sold in shopping malls, especially in the Santa Marta/El Rodadero area. Mochilas usually come in three sizes - a large one to carry bigger things, a medium one to carry personal belongings, and a small one to carry coca leaves. Coca leaves are carried by local tribe members to reduce hunger, increase energy and to combat altitude sickness.

Handicrafts such as intricately designed jewelery are commonly sold in markets and on street corners. Many street vendors will approach people, selling t-shirts, shorts, glasses, bracelets, watches, necklaces, souvenirs, and novelty photographs. If you want to buy something, this is a good time to exercise your bartering skills. Usually you can go down by 2,000 to 3,000 pesos, however 10%-15% is the generally accepted rule. For example, if someone is selling a shirt for P$10,000, try asking if you can pay P$8,000. Go from there.

If you don't want to buy anything, a simple gracias, ("thank you") and a non-committal wave of your hand will deter would-be sellers.

Money

The currency of Colombia is the Colombian peso, but the symbol you will encounter is $. Most banks and money changes will accept major world currencies such as the US dollar and the euro.

Costs

  • For transport, accommodations, tourism and food:

Typical prices: modest but clean (and occasionally charming) hotel: US$25 (50,000 COP), nice meal: US$15 for two, beers: US$0.60-1.50 depending on bar, bus: 100 km about US$6 (cheaper per km for longer trips, more for dirt roads), urban transport: 50 US cents.

This article is based on Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike 3.0 Licensed text from the article Colombia on Wikivoyage.

Cities in Colombia

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Parque 93 is the centerpiece of a lovely section of Bogotá, just north of the Zona Rosa. The whole neighborhood is a lovely place for walking, and has great restaurants and nightlife—especially on the park itself. The park is usually filled with temporary art installments, and sees frequent festivals. It's ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Museum of Colonial Art
  • Plaza de Bolivar
  • Catedral Primada de Colombia
  • Cathedral Primada
  • Botero Museum
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Cartagena is a city in Bolívar, Colombia.

Interesting places:

  • Cartagena Cathedral
  • Aduana Square
  • Inquisition Palace
  • Coches Square
  • Santo Domingo Square
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Medellín is the second largest city in Colombia. It has over 2 million people and is the capital of the department of Antioquia. It's set in a valley running south to north just under one hour by plane from Bogotá.

Interesting places:

  • La Candelaria Church
  • Berrio Park
  • Coltejer Building
  • Joaquin Antonio Uribe Botanical Garden
  • Palacio de la Cultura
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Santa Marta is a city in the Magdalena Department of Colombia's Costa Norte.

Interesting places:

  • Santa Marta Cathedral
  • Rodadero Beach
  • Tairona Gold Museum
  • Customs House
  • Parque de Los Novios
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San Andrés is one of the two principal islands of San Andrés and Providencia. It is located 200 Kilometres east of Nicaragua. San Andres and Providence belong to Colombia and are located in Colombian waters. San Andrés is a tourist destination but not as slick and modern as others in the Caribbean. The island ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Johnny Cay
  • Punta Norte
  • El Cove
  • Baptist Church
  • El Hoyo Soplador Geyser
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Cali is a city in southwestern Colombia, capital of the Valle del Cauca department. It has about 2 million inhabitants and it is a significant industrial and commercial center of activity in Colombia. Being at around 1,000 meters above sea level, it has a warm, but not excessively hot climate. It's best known ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Caicedo Square
  • Olympic Stadium Pascual Guerrero
  • La Ermita Church
  • Cali Cathedral
  • San Antonio Church
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Pereira is the capital city of the department of Risaralda in Colombia. It is in the center of the western region of the country, located in a small valley that descends from a part of the western Andes mountain chain. It is an urban center in the coffee producing region. Located in the middle of the triangle ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Plaza de Bolivar
  • Pereira Cathedral
  • Del Cafe National Park
  • Museum of Art
  • Pereira Golf Club
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Villavicencio is the capital of the Meta department of Colombia.

Interesting places:

  • Parque de la Vida
  • Macal Stadium
  • Llanabastos Market
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Cúcuta is in Colombia in the Andino region of Colombia.

Interesting places:

  • Plaza de la Independencia
  • Palacio de la Gobernacion
  • General Santander Stadium
  • Casa de la Cultura
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Get in

Interesting places:

  • Palogrande Stadium
  • Los Nevados National Park
  • Recinto del Pensamiento
  • Nevado del Ruiz
  • Reserva Ecologica Rio Blanco
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Melgar is a town in the Tolima department of Colombia. It is a popular getaway spot for Bogotanos and also home to a military base. It is known as the town of the thousand swimming pools.

Interesting places:

  • San Francisco de Asia Church
  • Cafam Melgar
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Villa de Leyva is a charming old colonial city in Boyacá in Colombia. Calm and tranquil on weekdays, it gets flooded by tourists from Bogotá on the weekends. Villa de Leyva is one of the few towns in Colombia that conserved all its colonial architecture. It is located 150 km north from Bogotá and has a nice ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Villa de Leyva Plaza Major
  • Pozos Azules
  • Zoocriadero Ostrich Farm
  • Villa de Leyva Fossil Museum
  • 1900 Theme Park
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Armenia is a city in Quindío department in the Andino region of Colombia.

Interesting places:

  • Centenario Stadium
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Tabatinga is a city in the north-western part of the state of Amazonas in Brazil. It forms a contiguous settlement with the Colombian town of Leticia. Santa Rosa on the nearby island in the river is in Peru.

Interesting places:

  • Amacayacu National Park
  • Santander Park
  • Amazonia World Theme Park
  • Amazonian Man Museum
  • Jose Marie Hernandez
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Cartagena is a city in Bolívar, Colombia.

Interesting places:

  • San Fernando Fort
  • Neo-Gothic Church Ruins
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Ibagué is the capital city of the Tolima department. It is located on the eastern slopes of the Cordillera Central and known as the musical city of Colombia, due to its famous conservatory. At 1250m above sea-level, it has a spring-like climate. Ibagué is a starting point for travellers who wish to do the ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Tolima Theater
  • Cathedral of the Immaculate Conception
  • Tolima Art Museum
  • University of Tolima
  • Manuel Murillo Toro Stadium
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Valledupar is the capital of the department of Cesar in Colombia and the birthplace of Vallenato music.

Interesting places:

  • Park 1 de Mayo
  • Balneario Hurtado
  • Valledupar House of Culture
  • Museo Del Acordeon Casa Beto Murgas
  • Valledupar Coliseum
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Neiva is the capital of the Huila department of Colombia. The city has been hit by a number of bomb attacks in 2010 and 2011. Advise extreme caution. See the stay safe section of this article.

Interesting places:

  • Santander Park
  • Neiva Cathedral
  • Guillermo Plazas Alcid Stadium
  • Alcvaro Sanchez Silva Coliseum
  • University Surcolombiana
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Buenaventura is a city in the Valle del Cauca department of Colombia. With a population of 324,207 (most of city development lies on Cascajal Island), it is the size of Los Angeles metropolitan area. Most of the city's land is rural with small villages scattered throughout. It is located a few miles from the ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Buenaventura Rampla
  • Juanchaco Beach
  • Ladrilleros Beach
  • La Barra Beach
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Interesting places:

  • Blanca Beach
  • Corales del Rosario National Park
  • Baru Church
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Popayán , is a colonial-era city in southwestern Colombia, capital of the Cauca department.

Interesting places:

  • Popayan Cathedral
  • Torre del Reloj
  • Teatro Municipal
  • University of Cauca
  • Museo de Historia Natural
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Islas del Rosario are a set of small islands in Colombia.

Interesting places:

  • Isla Grande Beach
  • Rosario Islands Oceanarium
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Interesting places:

  • Liberty Park
  • San Francisco Javier Church
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Interesting places:

  • Lancers Monument
  • House of Nitrate
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It is a very scenic island, with lovely empty beaches, a typical Caribbean climate, laid back atmosphere and friendly people. While the island depends quite heavily on tourism, it is not at all 'touristy' and only small hotels are present. The hotels on the island resemble more "guest lodges" than 5 star ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Bridge of Love
  • Manzanillo Beach
  • Crab Cay
  • Old Providence McBean Lagoon National Park
  • Peak Forestry Reserve
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Quimbaya is a town in Quindío.

Interesting places:

  • Panaca
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Marinilla is a city located in the East subregion of the department of Antioquia, Colombia. Bordered to the north by the municipalities of San Vicente and El Peñol, on the east by the municipalities of El Peñol and El Santuario, to the south by the municipalities Santuario and Carmen de Viboral, and to the ... (read more)

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Interesting places:

  • El Penon Golf Course
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San Gil is a city with a population of 50,000 in the Santander region in Colombia. It is known as Colombia's adventure sport capital.

Interesting places:

  • San Gil Cathedral
  • Liberty Park
  • Gallineral Natural Park
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Interesting places:

  • Catedral de Nuestra Senora del Rosario
  • Hospital San Juan De Dios
  • Plaza Municipal de Mercado
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Pasto is a city in the southwest of Colombia. City of the South Colombian West, with a population superior to the 400,000 inhabitants and capital of the department of Nariño. Pasto is one of the oldest cities of Colombia, located in the Atriz Valley, in the middle of the Mountain range of the Andes in the ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Plaza de Narino
  • Plaza del Carnaval
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Tolú is a small town in Costa Norte region of Colombia by the Caribbean sea.

Interesting places:

  • Tolcemento Park
  • Tolu Marina
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Interesting places:

  • Playa Isla Mucura
  • Punta Faro West Dock
  • Punta Faro East Dock
  • Picua Dive Site
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Interesting places:

  • Popular Mall
  • Ecopetrol Refinery
  • Christ Oil Sculpture
  • National Oil Museum
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Interesting places:

  • Buritaca Beach
  • Koralia Beach
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Interesting places:

  • Chia Mall
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Interesting places:

  • Coliseo de la Isleta
  • Bolivar Square
  • Parque de la Isleta
  • Casa Del Virrey
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Interesting places:

  • La Pintada Soccer Field
  • Puente Viejo
  • Santa Cecilia Church
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Santa Rosa de Cabal is a town and municipality in the department of Risaralda, west-central Colombia, on the western slopes of the Andean Cordillera Central. It is a commercial and manufacturing centre for the fertile agricultural and pastoral hinterland. Silkworms are raised in the vicinity, and there are ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Las Araucarias Park
  • Church of Our Lady of Victories
  • Santa Rosa De Cabal Hot Springs
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Capurganá is a city in the Choco region of Colombia. Surrounded on three sides by dense jungle, Capurganá is the last town of any reasonable size on the Colombian Caribbean coast before the border with Panama. A sleepy little place with a laid-back atmosphere, it is popular with Colombians, but is only just ... (read more)

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Interesting places:

  • Biopark La Reserva
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Interesting places:

  • Basilica of Our Lord of Miracles
  • Parque Ricaurte
  • Buga Culture House
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Arauca is a department of the Orinoquía region of Colombia.

Interesting places:

  • The Malecon
  • Simon Bolivar Park
  • Las Toninas Aqua Park
  • Arauca Market Plaza
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Guatapé is a small, very pretty lakeside town in Eastern Antioquia, about 1.5 hours from Medellín, Colombia.

Interesting places:

  • La Piedra Del Penol
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Interesting places:

  • Sugar Cane Museum
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Tunja is a city in northeast Colombia and the capital of the Boyacá department.

Interesting places:

  • Tunja Plaza de Bolivar
  • Tunja Cathedral
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Barranquilla is a city on the Caribbean Coast of Colombia.

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Aracataca is a small town in the Magdalena Department of Colombia, to the south of Santa Marta. Largely unknown to travelers and even to the guidebooks, this town absolutely should not be overlooked in the itinerary of anyone with any interest in Gabriel García Márquez. In addition to being his birthplace, it ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Aracataca Park
  • Aracataca Church
  • Gabriel Garcia Marquez House Museum
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Interesting places:

  • Plaza De Los Libertadores
  • Innovo Plaza Duitama
  • Duitama Cathedral
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Medellín is the second largest city in Colombia. It has over 2 million people and is the capital of the department of Antioquia. It's set in a valley running south to north just under one hour by plane from Bogotá.

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Interesting places:

  • Nuqui Beach
  • Olympica Beach
panoramio Photos are copyrighted by their owners

Points of Interest in Colombia

Much of Colombia is in the Andes, which means there is very nice mountainous scenery to be found. On the other hand, there are also nice beaches to be found in the lowlands. The altitude of some peaks mean that snow can be seen even though they lie in the tropics.

Inquisition Palace - Cartagena

Museum of Colonial Art - Bogota

La Candelaria Church - Medellin

Caicedo Square - Cali

Villa de Leyva Plaza Major - Villa de Leyva

Popayan Cathedral - Popayan

Santa Marta Cathedral - Santa Marta

Aduana Square - Cartagena

Cartagena Cathedral - Cartagena

Coches Square - Cartagena

Santo Domingo Square - Cartagena

Puerta del Reloj - Cartagena

Caribbean Naval Museum - Cartagena

San Pedro - Cartagena

Parque de La Marina - Cartagena

University of Cartagena - Cartagena

Plaza de Bolivar - Bogota

Catedral Primada de Colombia - Bogota

Cathedral Primada - Bogota

Casa del Marques de Premio Real - Cartagena

panoramio Photos are copyrighted by their owners

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