Sweden

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Sweden is the largest of the Nordic countries, with a population of about 9.5 million. It borders Norway and Finland and is connected to Denmark via the bridge of Öresund (Öresundsbron). The Baltic Sea, including the Gulf of Bothnia, lies east of Sweden, separating it from most of Finland. The northernmost part of Sweden is in the Arctic.

Population: 9,119,423 people
Area: 450,295 km2
Highest point: 2,111 m
Coastline: 3,218 km
Life expectancy: 81.28 years
GDP per capita: $41,900
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About Sweden

Background

Sweden was inhabited by the Suiones (svear) in Svealand and the Geats (götar) in Götaland. Some of these participated in Viking expeditions (see Scandinavia#History), and are said to have founded the first kingdoms in Russia.

Around AD 1000, Christianity replaced Norse paganism, Suiones and Geats united under one king, and the first cities were founded; among them Sigtuna, Uppsala and Skara. Swedish kings christened and annexed Finland. During the 14th and 15th century, Sweden was a subject of the Kalmar Union together with Norway and Denmark. King Gustav Vasa ascended as King of Sweden in 1523, and is regarded as the founder of modern Sweden. He also reformed the church to Lutheran-Protestant. Today's Sweden is a secular state with very few church-goers.

During the 17th century Sweden rose as a Great Power, through several successful wars, annexing Scania, Halland and Bohuslän from Denmark, as well as temporary possessions in the Baltic countries and northern Germany. However, the country has now been at peace since 1814; having long remained outside military alliances (including both World Wars), the country has a high peace profile, with internationally renowned names such as Raoul Wallenberg, Dag Hammarskjöld, Olof Palme and Hans Blix. Sweden is a monarchy by constitution, but king Carl XVI Gustaf has no executive power.

Sweden is a developed post-industrial society with an advanced welfare state. The standard of living and life expectancy rank among the highest in the world. Sweden joined the European Union in 1995, but decided by a referendum in 2003 not to commit to the European Monetary Union and the euro currency. Leadership of Sweden has for the larger part of the 20th century been dominated by the Social Democratic Party, which started out at the end of the 19th century as a labor movement. Since the 2006 election, a coalition of centre-right liberal/conservative parties hold the power.

Sweden has a strong tradition of being an open, yet discreet country. Citizens sometimes appear to be quite reserved at first, but once they get to know who they are dealing with, they'll be as warm and friendly as you'd wish. Privacy is regarded as a key item and many visitors, for example mega-stars in various lines of trade, have many times realized that they mostly can walk the streets of the cities virtually undisturbed.

Sweden houses the Nobel Prize committee for all the prizes except the peace prize which is hosted in Oslo, a memento of the Swedish-Norwegian union that was dissolved in 1905.

The year in Sweden

Weather in Sweden is typically cold from October to April, but in the summer (late May to early September) temperature lies around 20 degrees C. If you like snow, go to Norrland or Dalarna in January to April; see also winter in the Nordic countries.

Daylight varies greatly during the year. In Stockholm, the sun sets at 15:00 in December. North of the Arctic Circle one can experience the midnight sun and Arctic night. However, even at Stockholm's latitude, summer nights exist only in the form of prolonged twilight during June and July.

The major holidays are Easter (påsk), Midsummer (midsommar, celebrated from the eve of the Friday between June 19–25), Christmas (jul, Christmas Eve, Christmas Day and Boxing Day are all considered holidays), and the "industrial vacation" throughout July. Expect closed venues, heavy traffic (for the holidays) and crowded tourist resorts (for July).

Note that most Swedish holidays are celebrated on the day before (Midsummer's Eve, Christmas Eve etc.), while Swedish people usually stay at home on the holiday proper.

Activities

Outdoors

There's plenty of nature in Sweden, during the summer Kungsleden in northern Sweden attracts lots of visitors who enjoy a solitary hike between cabins or camp sites in the beautiful mountains. The Swedish Right to access (though not guarded by any law, only by tradition) gives anyone the right to walk over others property, as long as you do not destroy nor disturb. This means that you can go sailing or canoeing and make camp on island in the Stockholm Archipelago, you can go hiking and make camp almost wherever you want, however it is illegal to make a campfire on a rock surface. Sceneries of nature, less populated than most of Europe. Ice and snow during winter. The west coast has plenty of small towns like Marstrand, Skärhamn, Mollösund and Lysekil that are worth exploring with their distinct architecture and cuisine, best experienced during summer.

Sweden is great for outdoor life - winter sports, hiking, canoeing, horse riding and berry- or mushroom-picking depending of season. The ultimate test of aerobic fitness is the Swedish Classic Circuit; four annual races of cross-country skiing (Vasaloppet, from Sälen to Mora), running (Lidingöloppet), cycling (Vätternrundan starting from Motala) and swimming (Vansbrosimningen).

City-life

Stockholm and Gothenburg have great nightlife and shopping opportunities.

Music

Swedish popular music is world famous, with names such as ABBA, Roxette, Swedish House Mafia and others. Sweden hosts dozens of music festivals with international acts, as well as stars-to-be, most of them during summer. Sweden Rock Festival (Sölvesborg), Way Out West (Gothenburg) to mention but a few. There are also several festivals for folk, classical and jazz music.[42]

Choir (kör) music is big in Sweden, with regular performances even in smaller towns, not least the weeks before Christmas. [43]

Gambling

Gambling in Sweden is offered by the state (Svenska Spel), and a few privileged organizations.

Casino Cosmopol is a state-owned company with venues in Stockholm (Norrmalm), Gothenburg, Malmö and Sundsvall. Horse racing is a pastime in many Swedish cities, with tracks around the country. The most widespread class is harness racing, trav. Bookmaking is operated through ATG with on-line agents at the tracks, and in most towns. Several bars and restaurants have legally sanctioned slot machines, Jack Vegas.

Food

The staples of Swedish cuisine are meat, fish, dairy products, potatoes and bread. Fresh fruit and vegetables are rather recent additions to the menu.

Traditional everyday dishes are called husmanskost (pronounced whos-mans-cost). Some of them are:

  • Pickled herring (sill), available in various types of sauces. Formerly the poor man's food, it is eaten with bread or potatoes for summer lunch or as a starter on the smörgåsbord, at holidays such as midsummer, Christmas and Easter.
  • Cured salmon (gravlax), an appetizer made by thin slices of salmon cured in salt, sugar and dill.
  • Meatballs (köttbullar), the internationally most famous Swedish dish. Served with potatoes, brown sauce and lingonberry jam.
  • Hash (pytt i panna) consisting of meat, onions and potatoes, all diced and fried. Sliced beetroots and a fried or boiled whole eggs are mandatory accessories.
  • Pea soup (ärtsoppa) with diced pork, followed by thin pancakes (crepes) afterwards. Traditionally eaten on Thursdays; there are many just-so-stories about this tradition; one of them tells that the servants had half the day off, as it is an easy meal to prepare. Some lunch restaurants in Sweden serve pea soup and pancakes every Thursday.
  • Blodpudding, a black sausage made by pig's blood and flour. Slice it, fry it and eat it with lingonberry jam.
  • Falukorv, a big baloney from Falun. One of the most common ways of cooking it is sliced, fried and then served with ketchup and mashed potatoes.
  • Sweden has more varieties of bread (bröd) than most other countries. Many of them are whole-grain or mixed grain, containing wheat, barley, oats, compact and rich in fiber. Some notable examples are tunnbröd (thin wrap bread), knäckebröd (hard bread - might not be an interesting experience, but is nearly always available), and different kinds of seasoned loaves. Bread is mostly eaten as simple sandwiches, with thin slices of cheese or cold cuts. Some more exotic spreads are messmör (whey butter) and leverpastej (liver pâté).
  • Reindeer, ren, traditionally herded by the Sami people. Renskav is sliced, sautéed reindeer meat, preferrably eaten with wild mushrooms, lingonberries and potatoes.
  • Tunnbrödrulle, a fast food dish, consisting of a bread wrap with mashed potatoes, a hot dog and some vegetables.
  • Kroppkakor Potato dumpling stuffed with diced pork.
  • Hard cheese (ost): In an ordinary food market you can often find 10 to 20 different types of cheese. The most famous Swedish hard cheese would be Västerbotten, named after a region in Sweden.
  • Milk (mjölk) is commonly drunk to meals. Filmjölk is a Nordic yoghurt, eaten with breakfast cereal.
  • Rose hip soup (nyponsoppa) and bilberry soup (blåbärssoppa), for recovery of heat and energy during winter sports.

Other Swedish favorites:

  • Soft whey butter (messmör), breadspread with a sweetish, hard-to-describe taste.
  • Caviar, not the expensive Russian or Iranian kind but a cheaper version made from cod roe, sold in tubes and used on sandwiches. The most famous brand is Kalles Kaviar.
  • Julmust, stout-like Christmas soft drink that every year annoys The Coca-Cola Company in Sweden by lowering Coke's sales figures by 50%.
  • Crayfish (kräftor), hugely popular around August, when Swedes feast on them at big crayfish parties (kräftskivor). Silly paper hats and lots of alcohol included.
  • Surströmming; the world's stinkiest dish. See Norrland#Eat.
  • Semla, a cream-filled pastry traditionally eaten on Tuesdays in February and March, with start on Fat Tuesday.
  • Rabarberkräm/Rabarberpaj rhubarbcream or rhubarbpie with vanilla sauce ( other cakes or pies on fresh blueberries, apples, or just strawberries with cream or ice cream are also very popular in the summer)
  • Spettekaka A local cake from Scania in south Sweden, made of eggs, sugar, and potato starch.
  • Smörgåstårta A cold Sandwich layer cake, often with salmon, eggs, and shrimps. (Also often with tuna or roast beef) Swedish people often eat it at New Year's Eve, or birthdays and parties.
  • Lösgodis candy from boxes that you mix on your own, sold by weight, is one the most popular candy among this candy-loving nation. A choice of chocolate, sours, sweet and salt liqorice are always offered.
  • Swedish cookies and pastries like bondkakor, hallongrottor, bullar or cakes like prinsesstårta are widely popular. It used to be tradition to offer guest 7 different cookies when invited over for coffee. If you have a sweet tooth you should try chokladbollar, mazariner, biskvier, rulltårta, lussebullar, the list goes on...

As Sweden is stretched out between central Europe and the Arctic, there are many regional specialties. Among the more exotic are

  • Surströmming, a stinky canned fish popular along the Norrland coast.
  • Spettekaka, a meringue-like cake from Scania.

As in most of Europe, inexpensive pizza and kebab restaurants are ubiquitous in Swedish cities, and are also to be found in almost every small village. Note that the Swedish pizza is significantly different from Italian or American pizzas, American pizzas are usually sold as "pan pizza". Sushi and Thai food are also quite popular. The local hamburger chain Max is recommended before McDonald's and Burger King, for tasteful Scandinavian furnishing, clean restrooms, no trans fats and free coffee with meals. In parts of Norrland it is customary to eat hamburgers with fork and knife - available at Max. Another type of fast food establishment is the gatukök ("street kitchen"), serving hamburgers, hot dogs, kebab and tunnbrödrulle (se above).

Highway diners, vägkrogar, have generous meals, but might be of poor quality, greasy and overpriced. If you have time, a downtown restaurant is preferable. Gas stations sell decent packed salads and sandwiches.

You can get a "cheap" lunch if you look for the signs with "Dagens rätt" (meal of the day). This normally costs about 50-120 SEK (-) and almost everywhere includes a bottle of water; soft drink; or light beer, bread & butter, some salad and coffee afterwards. Dagens rätt is served Monday to Friday.

If you're on a tight budget, self-catering is the safest way to save your money.

Vegetarian and vegan lifestyles are accepted in cities, less common in the countryside, but you should be able to find a falafel in any medium-sized town.

Drinks

Coffee

Swedish consumption of coffee (kaffe) is among the highest in the world. Drinking coffee at home or in a café, an act called fika, is a common Swedish social ritual, used for planning activities, dating, exchanging gossip or simply spending time and money. Swedish coffee is usually stronger than American coffee - but still not the espresso of France or Italy. Italian varieties (espresso, cappuccino, caffe latte) are available at larger city cafés. One coffee will cost you around 25 SEK (/).

Alcoholic beverages

The most famous Swedish alcoholic beverage is Absolut Vodka, one of the world's most famous vodkas. There are several brands of distilled, and usually seasoned, liquor, called brännvin. Brännvin does not have as high requirements on distilling as for Vodka and it is distilled from potatoes or grain. Liquor seasoned with dill and caraway is called akvavit. When brännvin is served in a shot glass with a meal it is called snaps (not to confuse with the German "Schnapps"). It is part of custom to drink snaps at occasions such as midsummers eve, Crayfish party, Christmas, student parties, etc. Often it is done together with a snapsvisa to every drink (a typical snapsvisa is a short, vigorous song; its lyrics usually tell of the delicacy and glory of the drink, or of the singer’s craving for snaps, or just very cheeky).

If visiting Sweden in December or January a typical hot drink is glögg (similar to mulled wine or Glühwein). It is often served together with ginger bread and lussebullar or at the julbord (Christmas buffet). The main classic ingredients (of alcoholic glögg) are red wine, sugar, spices such as cinnamon, cardamom, ginger, cloves, and bitter orange, and optionally also stronger spirits such as vodka, akvavit, or brandy. There is also non alcoholic versions of glögg.

Sweden does produce some outstanding beers, and have in the recent years seen a rise in the numbers of microbreweries. If you are looking for great local beer keep an eye out for breweries like Slottskällans, Nils Oscar, Närke kulturbryggeri, Jämtlands ångbryggeri and Dugges Ale- & Porterbryggeri. You may have some trouble finding them, unless you go to a bar specialized in providing uncommon beer, or one of the well stocked Systembolaget, but you will find a few of them in every major city. Despite this the most common beer is the rather plain "international lager". The beer you get in normal food shops is called folköl and has 2.8 or 3.5% alcohol. You are able to find a variety of different brands of beers in food stores, Swedish, English and even Czech beer. Sweden has a seasonal beer for Christmas, julöl. It is sweeter than normal beer and usually seasoned with Christmas spices, mostly it is of the beer type ale. All Swedish breweries make at least one type of julöl. Wine is popular, but the Swedish production is very modest.

Drinking alcohol in parks and public areas is generally allowed, if notifications don't state the opposite. Drinking at public transport stations or on board is prohibited, with the exception of trains or boats serving alcohol in a bar.

Systembolaget

Beer and lager up to 3.5% ABV is readily available in supermarkets at 10-15 SEK a piece, but strong alcoholic beverages are, as in Norway, Finland and Iceland available over the counter only from the state-owned retailer, Systembolaget (also sometimes referred to as Systemet or Bolaget). They are usually open 10:00-18:00 Mon-Wed, 10:00-19:00 Thurs-Fri, and 10:00-15:00 on Saturdays, with long queues on Fridays and Saturdays, closing at the minute no matter how long the queue outside the store is, something the Swedes themselves joke about. They are always closed on Sundays. Most shops are of supermarket style. The assortment is very good, and the staff usually has great knowledge. Systembolaget does not serve customers under the age of 20 and will most likely ask for identification from younger looking customers. This also applies to any companions, regardless of who is making the actual purchase.

Beverages are heavily taxed by content of alcohol, some liquor is very expensive (vodka is around 300 SEK a liter at Systembolaget), but the monopoly has brought some perks - Systembolaget is one of the world's largest bulk-buyers of wine, and as such gets some fantastic deals which it passes on to consumers. Mid-to-high-quality wines often cost less in Sweden than in the country of origin; sometimes even less than if you were to buy the wine directly from the vineyard. This does not apply to low-quality wines or hard liquor, due to the volume-based tax on alcohol.

All brands are treated equally and there is no large-pack discount. Therefore, microbrews cost largely the same as major brands, and might be a more interesting choice. Beverages are not refrigerated. Drinking alcohol in public is usually allowed, with a few restrictions, such as shopping centres, playgrounds and public transport areas.

Bars and nightclubs

The minimum age requirement is 18 to get into bars and to buy regular (3.5% ABV or less) beer in shops (to prevent teenage drunkenness, some shops have decided to enforce a minimum age of 20 for 3.5% beer as well), and 20 in Systembolaget. Many bars have an age limit of 20, but some (especially downtown on weekends) have age limits as high as 23 or 25, but this rule is arbitrarily enforced. Bring passport or ID.

Some posh clubs mandate dress code, vårdad klädsel is casual dress; this is also arbitrarily enforced. For male guests, proper shoes (not sneakers or sandals), long-legged trousers (not blue jeans) and a dress shirt is almost always good enough.

Age or dress rules are not rigid, and doormen have the right to accept or reject any patron for any reason other than gender, sexual orientation, creed, disability or race. Though illegal, a few nightclubs are infamous for rejecting "immigrants", which usually means anyone with hair and skin darker than the average Swede, on pretexts such as "members only", "too drunk", or "dress code"; men of Middle Eastern or African origin are most often subjected to this. You might avoid this problem by dressing properly, behaving well and arriving fairly early. Don't argue with the guard, they are infamous for violence.

Sweden has enforced non-smoking in all bars, pubs and restaurants, save outdoor areas such as terraces, and designated smoking rooms (where drinks are not allowed).

The prices at clubs and bars are often expensive compared to other countries: a large beer (4 dl) usually costs 45-60 SEK (~), but many low-profile bars advertise stor stark (0.4 L of draft lager) for as little as 25 SEK early evenings. A long drink costs around 60-110 SEK. For that reason many Swedes have a small pre-party ("förfest") before they go out to get buzzed before they hit the town and go to nightclubs.

Large clubs can require a cover charge, usually about 100 SEK (or more at special performances). They usually offer a rubber stamp on your hand so you can re-enter as you like without having to pay again.

Be aware that you often have to stand in line to get into a bar or a club. Many places deliberately make their customers wait in line for a while, since a long queue indicates a popular club. At the very fanciest places in the major cities, the queue is often replaced by a disorganized crowd, and the doorman simply points to indicate who gets in and who does not (to be sure to get in either be famous, very good-looking or a friend of the doorman. Or simply a regular).

Most bars that close at 01:00 or earlier, will have a free entry policy. Most bars and clubs that remain open until 03:00 will charge an entrance fee. There are some clubs in the largest cities that remain open until 05:00. Their entrance fee will usually be around 200 SEK (~) and their entry policy will generally weigh less favourably for the non-rich, non-well-moisturised, non-Swedes, non-friends and non-regulars.

The club's wardrobe (or coat-checking) fee is often mandatory, usually around 20 SEK.

Authorized security guards carry a badge saying Ordningsvakt. The club's own doormen carry a badge saying Entrévärd. These should be taken seriously, see #Stay safe.

Moonshine (hembränt) is popular in the countryside, though illegal. Though some shipments can be as good as legal vodka, most are disgusting, so you should stick to the real thing.

Shopping

The national currency is the Swedish krona (SEK, plural kronor), distinct from other currencies, such as the Norwegian or Danish krona. Automatic teller machines take major credit cards. Most stores, restaurants and bars accept all major credit cards. You might need an ID card or a passport when shopping with a credit card, though not in supermarkets and such where PIN code is king.

Haggling is not commonly used, but it might work in some instances, especially when buying more expensive products. Bargaining is also okay at flea markets and in antique shops. Tipping is not mandatory when dining out. You can tip 5-10%, or round the bill up if you've had a nice experience.

Most shops, at least major chains in central areas, are open all week, even on Sundays. Closing times are rigid, most often on the minute.

Many Swedes translate the word krona, which means crown. For example, instead of saying 50 kronor they might say 50 crowns when speaking English.

Counterfeit Swedish money is very rare. Newer 50, 100, 500 and 1000 SEK notes have holograms. Older banknotes without a hologram are invalid, but are still accepted at banks.

Cash machines

The most used Swedish word for automated teller machine is Bankomat, although this is technically a trademark of the Trade Bank Consortium, much like the term cash point in the United Kingdom, and therefore not used by several banks. A more generic word would be Uttagsautomat; Uttag, Minuten and Kontanten may also occur. Nearly all machines regardless of operator will accept the MasterCard, Maestro, Visa, Visa Electron and American Express. You can withdraw up to 10 000 SEK per use. During a seven-day period you can withdraw a maximum of 20 000 SEK.

You have three attempts to enter the correct PIN code. If you fail a third time, the machine retains the card and closing it. In order to facilitate the visually impaired have the keys on the machines equipped with Braille. You may have spoken guidance, press the TALK button. In some ATMs you can withdraw euros if you have a card issued by a Swedish bank. You may take up the maximum per use. You can make multiple withdrawals after the other but a maximum 20 000 SEK per week.

Costs

As of 2013, Sweden is one of the more expensive countries to inhabit. For example: Sundries like a 33 cl bottle of Coca Cola costs 10 SEK, a beer in a bar will cost you around 45 SEK, the average price of hotel accommodation is around 1300 SEK, a room in a hostel varies between 150 and 350 SEK, a bus/subway ticket in Stockholm, Gothenburg and Malmö will set you back around 25 SEK, one meal will cost you around 100 SEK, 1 litre of petrol fuel costs about 15 SEK and a pack of 19 cigarettes will cost you 50 SEK. If you are a bit careful about your expenses, a daily budget of around 1000 SEK will be enough. House prices outside metropolitan areas are probably among the lowest in Western Europe, and discount stores such as Lidl, Netto and Willys offer a wide range of items to a low cost. Accommodation and dining out are cheaper in Stockholm than in most other West European capitals.

Taxes

Sweden has three levels of value-added tax (moms or mervärdesskatt). Financial transactions, gambling, healthcare (including dentistry), prescripted medication and unique works of art are exempt from VAT. The 6 per cent level applies to passenger transport, print media, sports, performances, zoos and museums. The 12 per cent level applies to travel accommodation and food (including restaurant meals and soft drinks, but not alcoholic beverages). Everything else has 25 percent VAT; that includes clothing, alcohol, tobacco, non-prescripted medication, appliances, souvenirs, amusement parks, nightclubs, hairdressing etc.

Price tags always include tax, except in business-to-business context (wholesale stores, etc).

Shopping

  • An unofficial national symbol, the Dala Horse (Swedish: dalahäst) is the souvenir of souvenirs to bring from Sweden. Named after their origin, the province of Dalarna, these small wooden horses have been around since the 17th century. They are normally painted orange or blue with symmetrical decorations. They are fairly expensive: expect to pay around 100 SEK for a very small one or several hundred SEK for bigger versions. The horses can be bought in souvenir shops all over Sweden. If you want to know more about how the horses are made, visit Dalarna and the municipality of Mora where the horses are carved and painted in workshops open for tourists. And if driving towards Mora from Stockholm, keep your eyes open when you pass the town of Avesta where the world's largest (13 meters high) Dala Horse overlooks the highway.
  • Swedish glass is world famous for its beauty. Several skilled glass artists have contributed to this reputation through innovative, complex (and expensive) art creations, but mass-produced Swedish table glass has also been an international success. Part of the province of Småland, between the towns of Växjö and Kalmar, is known as the Kingdom of Crystal. 15 glassworks are packed into this small area, the most famous being Orrefors, Kosta and Boda. Tourists are welcome to watch the glass blowers turn the glowing melt into glittering glass, and you can even give it a try yourself.
  • High-end wines from Systembolaget.
  • Swedish design, spanning from furniture to jewelry, is known for function, efficiency and minimalism. Designtorget [44] is a chain of stores with a wide range of everyday products. Svenskt Tenn is another store with beautiful items by designers such as Josef Frank.
  • There are some items for the home that are invented by swedes that might be fun to bring home such as the cheese slicer, adjustable spanners or adjustable wrenches, safety matches, paraffin cooking stove (Primuskök) or a good old Celsius thermometer.
  • Flea markets are literally translated as loppmarknad or loppis, and one of few places where bargaining is accepted.

This article is based on Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike 3.0 Licensed text from the article Sweden on Wikivoyage.

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Solna [ˈsoːlˈna] and Sundbyberg [sɵndbyˈbærj] are two autonomous cities just north of the Vasastan and Östermalm districts of inner Stockholm, bordering Västerort (the western outskirts of Stockholm municipality) to the west, and Stockholm's northern suburbs to the north.

Interesting places:

  • Haga Palace
  • Pampas Marina
  • Ulriksdal Palace
  • Karlberg Castle Park
  • Solna Centrum Mall
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11 hotels in this place

Norrköping is located in Östergötland in Sweden. It is Sweden's 8th largest municipality with a population of more than 128 000. Traditionally, it was dominated by the paper and textile industry, giving it the nickname "The Manchester of Sweden".

Interesting places:

  • Work Museum
  • City Museum
  • Louis de Geer Concert and Congress Hall
  • Power Park
  • Ostgota Theater
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11 hotels in this place

Helsingborg is in the Scania province of southern Sweden.

Interesting places:

  • Main Square
  • St Maria Kyrka
  • City Hall
  • Ferry Terminal
  • Karnan
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States in Sweden

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292 hotels in this place

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83 hotels in this place

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Points of Interest in Sweden

Palaces

Sweden has more palaces (slott), castles and manors than other Scandinavian countries. Eleven of them belong to the Royal Family, and are to some extent open to the public. Stockholm Palace (Stockholm/Gamla Stan), Rosendal (Stockholm/Djurgården), Haga, Gustav III:s pavilion and Ulriksdal (Solna), Drottningholm and Kina (Ekerö), Tullgarn (Södertälje) and Rosersberg (Sigtuna) are within greater Stockholm. Gripsholm (Mariefred) and Strömsholm (Hallstahammar) are further away. The farmland areas are full of noble and bourgeois manors from the 17th century and onwards; many of them are today used at hotels.

Industrial heritage

While the Bergslagen district, Roslagen and other parts of Sweden became world-leading in mining and metalworking during the 17th century, the full industrialization of Sweden lagged behind the rest of Europe until the 20th century, when Swedish product brands such as Volvo, Ericsson, SAAB, SKF, AGA, IKEA, Tetra Pak and Atlas Copco conquered the world. During the last decades, most of Swedish workforce has moved on to high technology and the service sector, converting many of the mines, factories and waterways to museums. Among them are Göta Kanal from the Baltic Sea to the Atlantic, the copper mine in Falun, and the Nobel Museum in Stockholm.

House of Nobility - Stockholm

Gustav Adolf Square - Gothenburg

Malmo Borshus - Malmo

Uppsala Cathedral - Uppsala

Main Square - Helsingborg

Lund Cathedral - Lund

Visby Cathedral - Visby

Hertig Johan\'s Square - Skovde

Swedish Parliament (Sveriges riksdag) - Stockholm

The Great Cathedral of Stockholm (Storkyrkan) - Stockholm

King\'s Garden - Stockholm

Royal Swedish Opera (Kungliga Operan) - Stockholm

Riddarholmen Church - Stockholm

Stockholm City Museum (Stockholms stadsmuseum) - Stockholm

Stockholm Stock Exchange Building (Borshuset) - Stockholm

Nobel Museum - Stockholm

Stortorget - Stockholm

Sodra Teatern - Stockholm

Mosebacke Square - Stockholm

Gustav Adolf Square - Stockholm

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