Poland

  • 2 hotels

  • 10 hotels

  • 58 hotels

  • 261 hotels

  • 150 hotels

  • 37 hotels

518 hotels in this place

Poland , is a country in Central Europe. It has a long Baltic Sea coastline and is bordered by Belarus, the Czech Republic, Germany, Lithuania, Russia (Kaliningrad Oblast), Slovakia, and Ukraine.

Population: 38,383,809 people
Area: 312,685 km2
Highest point: 2,499 m
Coastline: 440 km
Life expectancy: 76.45 years
GDP per capita: $20,900
Sort by:

No rooms are available for given criteria.

Sort by:

Interactive map

interactive map

Welcome to our interactive map!

Accommodation

Room 1:
Child age:

Filter the result


Legend

Hotels

  • 5 star hotels 5 star hotel
  • 4 star hotels 4 star hotel
  • 3 star hotels 3 star hotel
  • 2 star hotels 2 star hotel
  • 1 star hotels 1 star hotel

Cities

  • Metropolis over 100 hotels
  • Big city 50-100 hotels
  • Medium city 20-50 hotels
  • Small city 5-20 hotels
  • Village below 5 hotels

Points of Interest

  • Beach Beach
  • Business object Business object
  • Casino Casino
  • Civic property Civic property
  • Education Education
  • Entertainment Entertainment
  • Golf course Golf course
  • Green space Green space
  • Harbor Harbor
  • Historic site Historic site
  • Interesting place Interesting place
  • Medical Medical
  • Monument Monument
  • Museum Museum
  • Shopping Shopping
  • Skiing Skiing
  • Sports facility Sports facility
  • Theater Theater
  • Winery Winery

About Poland

History

Early history

The first cities in today's Poland, Kalisz and Elbląg on the Amber Trail to the Baltic Sea, were mentioned by Roman writers in the first century AD, but the first Polish settlement in Biskupin dates even further back to the 7th century BC.

Poland was first united as a country in the first half of the 10th century, and officially adopted Catholicism in 966 AD. The first capital was in the city of Gniezno, but a century later the capital was moved to Kraków, where it remained for half a millennium.

Poland experienced its golden age from 14th till 16th century, under the reign of king Casimir the Great, and the Jagiellonian dynasty, whose rule extended from the Baltic to the Black and Adriatic seas. In the 16th century, the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth was the largest country in Europe; the country attracted significant numbers of foreign migrants, including Germans, Jews, Armenians and Dutch, thanks to the freedom of confession guaranteed by the state and the atmosphere of religious tolerance (rather exceptional in Europe at the time of the Holy Inquisition).

Under the rule of the Vasa dynasty, the capital was moved to Warsaw in 1596. During the 17th and the 18th centuries, the nobility increasingly asserted its independence of the monarchy; combined with several exhausting wars, this greatly weakened the Commonwealth. Responding to the need for reform, Poland was the 1st country in Europe (and the 2nd in the world, after the US) to pass a constitution. The constitution of May 3, 1791 was the key reform among many progressive but belated attempts to strengthen the country during the second half of the 18th century.

Partitions and regaining independence

With the country in political disarray, various sections of Poland were subsequently occupied by its neighbors, Russia, Prussia and Austria, in three coordinated "partitions" of 1772 and 1793, and 1795. After the last partition and a failed uprising, Poland ceased to exist as a country for 123 years.

However, this long period of foreign domination was met with fierce resistance. During the Napoleonic Wars, a semi-autonomous Duchy of Warsaw arose, before being erased from the map again in 1813. Further uprisings ensued, such as the 29 November uprising of 1830-1831 (mainly in Russian Poland), the 1848 Revolution (mostly in Austrian and Prussian Poland), and 22 January 1863. Throughout the occupation, Poles retained their sense of national identity, and kept fighting the subjugation of the three occupying powers.

Poland returned to the map of Europe with the end of World War I, officially regaining its independence on November 11, 1918. Soon, by 1920-21, the newly-reborn country got into territorial disputes with Czechoslovakia and, especially, the antagonistic and newly Soviet Russia with which it fought a war. This was further complicated by a hostile Weimar Germany to the west, which strongly resented the annexation of portions of its eastern Prussian territories, and the detachment of German-speaking Danzig (contemporary Gdańsk) as a free city.

World War II

World War II officially began with a coordinated attack on Poland's borders by the Soviet Union from the east and Nazi Germany from the west and north. Only a few days prior to the start of WWII, the Soviet Union and Germany had signed a secret pact of non-aggression, which called for the re-division of the newly independent central and eastern European nations. Germany attacked Poland on September 1, 1939, and the Soviet Union attacked Poland on September 17, 1939, effectively starting the fourth partition, causing the recently-reestablished Polish Republic to cease to exist. Hitler used the issue of Danzig (Gdańsk) and German nationalism to try to trigger a war with Poland in much the same way he used the "Sudetenland Question" to conquer the Czechs.

Many of WWII's most infamous war crimes were committed by both the Nazis and Soviets on Polish territory, with the former committing the vast majority of them. Polish civilians opposed to either side's rule were ruthlessly rounded up, tortured, and executed.

Nazi Germany established both concentration and extermination camps on Polish soil, where many millions of Europeans — including about 90% of Poland's long-standing Jewish population and thousands of local Romany (Gypsies) — were ruthlessly murdered; of these Auschwitz is perhaps the most infamous. The Nazis murdered about three million Polish Jews and about the same number of Polish non-Jews — not only people who actively opposed the Nazi occupation, but also people randomly rounded up and shot, gassed, or taken prisoner for slave labour under acutely life-threatening conditions in concentration camps. Part of the Nazis' strategy was to attempt to annihilate all Polish intelligentsia and potential future leadership, the better to absorb Poland into Germany, so thousands of Polish Catholic priests and intellectuals were summarily murdered.

The Soviets rounded up and executed the cream of the crop of Polish leadership in the part of Poland they occupied in the Katyń Massacre of 1940. About 22,000 Polish military and political leaders, business owners, and intelligentsia were murdered in the massacre, officially approved by the Soviet Politburo, including by Stalin and Beria.

Concurrently with all the suffering, there was much heroism in Poland during World War II. The Polish Home Army (Armia Krajowa) was one of several Polish partisan armies that fought the Nazis and, to a lesser extent, the Soviets. It was among the largest partisan armies in Nazi-occupied Europe, and conducted a variety of relatively effective intelligence-gathering and sabotage operations, killing over 100,000 Axis soldiers in the process. Through their Government-in-Exile in London, they attempted to publicize the Nazis' "Final Solution of the Jewish Problem," but were unsuccessful in gaining Allied help in fighting it. However, they are credited with helping to save about 50,000 Jewish lives, and also prevented the Nazis from carrying out in Poland their Generalplan Ost ("Eastern Master Plan"), under which the great majority of Poland's non-German population would have been expelled or murdered, with the rest enslaved.

Due to WWII, Poland lost about 20% of its population, added to the fact that the Polish economy was completely ruined. Nearly all major cities were destroyed and with them the history of centuries was gone. After the war Poland was forced to become a Soviet satellite country, following the Yalta and Potsdam agreements between the Western Allies and the Soviet Union. To this day these events are viewed by many Poles as an act of betrayal by the Allies. Poland's territory was significantly reduced and shifted westward to the Oder-Neisse Line at the expense of defeated Germany. The native Polish populations from the former Polish territories in the east, now annexed by the Soviet Union, were expelled by force and replaced the likewise expelled German populations in the west and in the north of the country. This resulted in the forced uprooting of over 10 million people and until recently had shadowed attempts at Polish-German reconciliation.

Communism (People's Republic of Poland)

After World War II, Poland was forced to become a Socialist Republic, and to adopt a strong pro-Soviet stance. Between 1945 and 1953, pro-Stalinist leaders conducted periodic purges. In particular, members of the Polish Home Army and other partisan organizations that had opposed Soviet as well as German domination of Poland were executed in large numbers. There were also pogroms after the war; the most notorious was the 1946 Kielce pogrom, which was allegedly incited by Stalin's NKVD secret police, though based on the traditional Christian blood libel against Jews and with very weak condemnation, at best, from Polish cardinals. The result of the pogroms was that most of the Jewish survivors of Nazi persecution emigrated, effectively ending centuries of strong Jewish influence on the history of Poland that has somewhat revived only since the end of communist rule created a less hostile climate for renewed interest in the country's Jewish heritage.

After the bloody Stalinist era of 1945-1953, Poland was comparatively tolerant and progressive in comparison to other Eastern Bloc countries. But strong economic growth in the post-war period alternated with serious recessions in 1956, 1970, and 1976 which resulted in labour turmoil over dramatic inflation as well as shortages of goods. Ask older Poles to tell you about communism and you'll often hear stories of empty store shelves where sometimes the only thing available for purchase was vinegar. You'll hear stories about back room deals to get meat or bread, such as people trading things at the post office just to get ham for a special dinner.

A brief reprieve from this history occurred in 1978. The then-archbishop of Kraków, Karol Wojtyła, was elected as Pope of the Roman Catholic Church, taking the name John Paul II. This had a profound impact on Poland's largely Catholic population, and to this day John Paul II is widely revered in the country.

In 1980, the anti-communist trade union, "Solidarity" (Polish: Solidarność), became the major driving force in a strong opposition movement, organizing labor strikes, and demanding freedom of the press and democratic representation. The communist government responded by organizing a military junta, led by general Wojciech Jaruzelski, and imposing martial law from December 13, 1981 to July 22, 1983. During this period, thousands of people were detained. Phone calls were monitored by the government, independent organizations not aligned with the Communists were deemed illegal and members were arrested, access to roads was restricted, the borders were sealed, ordinary industries were placed under military management, and workers who failed to follow orders faced the threat of a military court. Solidarity was the most famous of various organizations which were illegalized, and its members faced the possibility of losing their jobs and imprisonment.

In any event, this internecine conflict and ensuing economic disaster greatly weakened the role of the Communist Party. Solidarity was eventually legalized again, and shortly thereafter led the country to its first free elections in 1989, in which the communist government was finally removed from power. This inspired a succession of peaceful anti-communist revolutions throughout the Warsaw Pact bloc.

Contemporary Poland (Third Republic of Poland)

Nowadays, Poland is a democratic country with a stable and robust economy. It has been a member of NATO since 1999 and the European Union since 2004. The country's stability has been recently underscored by the fact that the tragic deaths of the President and a large number of political, business and civic leaders in an plane crash did not have an appreciable negative effect on the Polish currency or economic prospects. Poland has also successfully joined the border-less Europe agreement (Schengen), with an open border to Germany, Lithuania, Czech Republic and Slovakia, and is on track to adopt the Euro currency in a few years time. Poland's dream of rejoining Europe as an independent nation at peace and in mutual respect of its neighbors has finally been achieved.

Activities

Travel one of the European Cultural Routes that cross Poland: for example Cisterian Route.

Food

Poles take their meals following the standard continental schedule: a light breakfast in the morning (usually some sandwiches with tea/coffee), then a larger lunch (or traditionally a "dinner") at around 13:00-14:00, then a supper at around 19:00.

It is not difficult to avoid meat, with many restaurants offering at least one vegetarian dish. Most major cities have some exclusively vegetarian restaurants, especially near the city centre. Vegan options remain extremely limited, however.

Traditional local food

Traditional Polish cuisine tends to be hearty, rich in meats, sauces, and vegetables; sides of pickled vegetables are a favourite accompaniment. Modern Polish cuisine, however, tends towards greater variety, and focuses on healthy choices. In general, the quality of "store-bought" food is very high, especially in dairy products, baked goods, vegetables and meat products.

A dinner commonly includes the first course of soup, followed by the main course. Among soups, barszcz czerwony (red beet soup, also known as borscht) is perhaps the most recognizable: a spicy and slightly sour soup, served hot. It's commonly poured over dumplings (barszcz z uszkami or barszcz z pierogami), or served with a fried pate roll (barszcz z pasztecikiem). Other uncommon soups include zupa ogórkowa, a cucumber soup made of a mix of fresh and pickled cucumbers; zupa grzybowa, typically made with wild mushrooms; also, flaki or flaczki - well-seasoned tripe. The most common in restaurants is the żurek, a sour-rye soup served with traditional Polish sausage and a hard-boiled egg.

Pierogi are, of course, an immediately recognizable Polish dish. They are often served along side another dish (for example, with barszcz), rather than as the main course. There are several types of them, stuffed with a mix of cottage cheese and onion, or with meat or even wild forest fruits. Gołąbki are also widely known: they are large cabbage rolls stuffed with a mix of grains and meats, steamed or boiled and served hot with a white sauce or tomato sauce.

Bigos is another unique, if less well-known, Polish dish: a "hunter's stew" that includes various meats and vegetables, on a base of pickled cabbage. Bigos tends to be very thick and hearty. Similar ingredients can also be thinned out and served in the form of a cabbage soup, called kapuśniak. Some Austro-Hungarian imports have also become popular over the years, and adopted by the Polish cuisine. These include gulasz, a local version of goulash that's less spicy than the original, and sznycel po wiedeńsku, which is a traditional schnitzel, often served with potatoes and a selection of vegetables.

When it comes to food-on-the-go, foreign imports tend to dominate (such as kebab or pizza stands, and fast-food franchises). An interesting Polish twist is a zapiekanka, which is an open-faced baguette, covered with mushrooms and cheese (or other toppings of choice), and toasted until the cheese melts. Zapiekanki can be found at numerous roadside stands and bars.

Poland is also known for two unique cheeses, both made by hand in the [Podhale] mountain region in the south. Oscypek is the more famous: a hard, salty cheese, made of unpasteurized sheep milk, and smoked (or not). It goes very well with alcoholic beverages such as beer. The less common is bryndza, a soft cheese, also made with sheep milk (and therefore salty), with a consistency similar to spreadable cheeses. It's usually served on bread, or baked potatoes. Both cheeses are covered by the EU Protected Designation of Origin (like the French Roquefort, or the Italian Parmegiano-Reggiano).

Milk bars

If you want to eat cheaply, you should visit a milk bar (bar mleczny). A milk bar is very basic sort of fast food restaurant that serves cheap Polish fare. Nowadays it has become harder and harder to find one. It was invented by the communist authorities of Poland in mid-1960s as a means to offer cheap meals to people working in companies that had no official canteen. Its name originates from the fact that until late 1980s the meals served there were mostly dairy-made and vegetarian (especially during the martial law period of the beginning of the 1980s, when meat was rationed). The milk bars are usually subsidized by the state. Eating there is a unique experience - it is not uncommon that you will encounter people from various social classes - students, businessmen, university professors, elderly people, sometimes even homeless, all eating side-by-side in a 1970s-like environment. Presumably, it is the quality of food at absolutely unbeatable price (veggie main courses starting from just a few złoty!) that attracts people. However, a cautionary warning needs to be issued - complete nut jobs do dine at milk bars too, so even if you're going to for the food, you'll end up with dinner and a show. Curious as to what the show will entail? Well, each show varies, but most of them will leave you scratching head and require the suspension of reality.

Drinks

Poland is on the border of European "vodka" and "beer culture". Poles enjoy alcoholic drinks but they drink less than the European average. You can buy beer, vodka and wine. Although Poland is known as the birthplace of vodka, local beer seems to have much more appeal to many Poles. Another traditional alcoholic beverage is mead. Polish liqueurs and nalewka (alcoholic tincture) are a must.

Officially, in order to buy alcohol one should be over 18 years old and be able to prove it with a valid ID (which is strictly enforced).

Beer

Poland's brewery tradition began in the Middle Ages. Today Poland is one of top beer countries in Europe.

Although not well known internationally, Poland traditionally sports some of the best pilsner-type lagers worldwide. The most common big brands include:

  • Żywiec (pronounced ZHIV-y-ets)
  • Tyskie (pronounced TIS-kye)
  • Okocim (pronounced oh-KO-cheem)
  • Lech (pronounced LEH)
  • Warka (pronounced VAR-kah)
  • Łomża (pronounced Uom-zha)

Micro-breweries and gastro-pubs are on the rise, in particular in the larger cities, and many delicatessen or supermarkets carry smaller brands, including hand-crafted beers of many types.

Vodka

Common brands are:

  • Żubrówka (Zhoo-BROOF-ka) - vodka with flavors derived from Bison Grass, from eastern Poland.
  • Żołądkowa Gorzka (Zho-wont-KO-va GOSH-ka) - vodka with "bitter" (gorzka) in the name, but sweet in taste. Just like Żubrówka, it's a unique Polish product and definitely a must-try.
  • Wiśniówka (Vish-NIOOF-ka) - Cherry vodka (very sweet).
  • Krupnik (KROOP-nik) - Honey and spices vodka, a traditional Polish-Lithuanian recipe (very sweet). During winter, many bars sell Grzany Krupnik (warm Krupnik), where hot water, cinnamon, cloves, and citrus zest or slices are added.
  • Żytnia (ZHIT-nea) - rye vodka
  • Wyborowa (Vi-bo-RO-va) - One of Poland's most popular rye vodkas. This is also one of the most common exported brands. Strong and pleasant.
  • Luksusowa (Look-sus-OH-vah) "Luxurious" - Another popular brand, and a common export along with Wyborowa.
  • Starka "Old" - A vodka traditionally aged for years in oak casks. Of Lithuanian origin.

Deluxe (more expensive) brands include Chopin and Belvedere. Expect to pay about 100 zł a bottle (2007 prices). Most Poles consider these brands to be "export brands", and usually don't drink them.

  • Biała Dama (Be-AH-wa DAH-ma) is not actually a vodka but a name given by winos to cheap rectified spirits of dubious origin, best avoided if you like your eyesight the way it is.

Wine

Poland does make wines around Zielona Góra in Lubuskie, in Małopolskie, in the Beskids and in Świętokrzyskie in central Poland. They used to be only available from the winery or at regional wine festivals, such as in Zielona Góra. But with a new law passed in 2008, this has changed and Polish wines are also available in retail stores.

As for imported wine, apart from the usual old and new world standards, there is usually a choice of decent table wines from central and eastern Europe, such as Austria, Bulgaria, Hungary, Romania, Moldova, the Balkans, and Georgia.

It winter, many Poles drink grzaniec (mulled wine), made of red wine heated with spices such as cloves, nutmeg, and ginger. A similar drink can be made with beer, although wine is the more popular method.

Mead

Mead - miód pitny is a traditional and historical alcohol drink in Poland. Mead is brewed from honey and has excellent unusual taste similar to wine. Original Polish mead contain 13-20% alcohol. Sometimes it can be very sweet. Today Poles have a strange relationship with mead. All of them have heard of it, almost none have ever tried it.

Cocktails

Poles are very keen on beer and vodka, and you'll find that cocktails are often expensive but can be found in most bars in most major cities.

Tea and coffee

Throw stereotypes out the door. For Poles, one of the most important staples to quench their thirst is not wódka or beer, but rather tea and coffee.

When ordering a coffee, you'll find that it is treated with respect reminiscent of Vienna, rather than, say, New York. Which is to say: you'll get a fresh cup prepared one serving at a time, with table service that assumes you'll sit down for a while to enjoy it. Mass-produced to-go coffee remains highly unpopular, although chains such as Coffee Heaven have been making inroads. Curiously, there are still only a few Starbucks shops in the whole country.

Ordering a tea, on the other hand, will usually get you a cup or kettle of hot water, and a tea bag on the side, so that the customer can put together a tea that's as strong or as weak as they like. This is not uncommon in continental Europe, but may require some adjustment for visitors. Drinking tea with milk is not popular, traditionally Poles add a slice of lemon and sugar, unless they drink flavored tea. Tea houses with large selection of good quality teas and a relaxing atmosphere are gaining popularity.

For the most part, a good coffee can be had for 5 - 10 zł a cup, while a cup of tea can be purchased for the same, unless you happen to order a small kettle, in which case you'll probably pay something between 20 - 30 zł.

Water

Drinking water with a meal is not a Polish tradition; having a tea or coffee afterwards is much more common. If you want water with a meal, you might need to ask for it - and you will usually get a choice of carbonated (gazowana) or still (niegazowana) bottled water, rather than a glass of tap water. As a result water is never free, and is pretty expensive too compared to the average price of a meal (about 4zl for one glass). Beware that even "still" bottled water, while not visibly bubbly, will still contain some carbon dioxide.

Carbonated mineral waters are popular, and several kinds are available. Poland was known for its mineral water health spas (pijalnia wód) in the 19th century, and the tradition remains strong - you can find many carbonated waters that are naturally rich in minerals and salts. You can also travel to the spas such as Szczawnica or Krynica, which are still operational.

Opinions regarding the safety of tap water vary: odds are its OK, but most residents opt to boil or filter it anyway.

Shopping

Paying

The legal tender in Poland is the Polish złoty (zł, international abbreviation: PLN). The złoty divides into 100 groszy (check the box to details). Poland is expected to adopt the Euro (€) sometime after 2014, but those plans are still tentative.

Private currency exchange offices (Polish: kantor) are very common, and offer Euro or USD exchanges at rates that are usually comparable to commercial banks. Be aware that exchanges in tourist hot-spots, such as the train stations or popular tourist destinations, tend to overcharge. Avoid "Interchange" Kantor locations, easily recognized by their orange color; the rates they offer are very bad.

There is also an extensive network of cash machines or ATMs (Polish: bankomat). The exchange rate will depend on your particular bank, but usually ends up being pretty favorable, and comparable to reasonably good exchange offices, but you will probably find very high "service fees" in your bank statement when you get home.

Credit cards can be used to pay almost everywhere in the big cities. Popular cards include Visa, Visa Electron, MasterCard and Maestro. AmEx and Diners' Club can be used in a few places (notably the big, business-class hotels) but are not popular and you should not rely on them for any payments.

Cheques were never particularly popular in Poland and they are not used nowadays. Local banks do not issue cheque books to customers and stores do not accept them.

Goods

It is illegal to export goods older than 55 years that are of ANY historic value. If you intend to do so you need to obtain a permit from the Ministry of Culture and National Heritage [46].

Shopping

Super and hypermarkets

Hypermarkets are dominated by western chains: Carrefour, Tesco, Auchan, Real. Some are open 24 hours a day. Usually located in shopping malls or suburbs.

However Poles shop very often at local small stores for bread, meat, fresh dairy, vegetables and fruits - goods for which freshness and quality is essential.

Prices in Poland are some of the lowest in Europe.

Town markets

Many towns, and larger suburbs, hold traditional weekly markets, similar to farmers' markets popular in the West. Fresh produce, baker's goods, dairy, meat and meat products are sold, along with everything from flowers and garden plants to Chinese-made clothing and brick-a-brac. In season wild mushrooms and forest fruit can also be bought. Markets are held on Thursdays / Fridays and/or Saturdays and are a great way to enjoy the local colour. Prices are usually set though you can try a little good-natured bargaining if you buy more than a few items.

This article is based on Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike 3.0 Licensed text from the article Poland on Wikivoyage.

Popular cities in Poland

  • 0 hotels

  • 5 hotels

  • 22 hotels

  • 102 hotels

  • 43 hotels

  • 10 hotels

182 hotels in this place

The Old City of Kraków, referred to in Polish as Stare Miasto, forms the historical kernel of this vibrant Polish city and is the first target for most travellers to the city, with regard to accommodation, eating out, entertainment, and attractions.

Interesting places:

  • Archaelogical Museum of Krakow
  • Main Market Square
  • Town Hall Tower
  • Church of St. Wojciech
  • Cloth Hall
  • 0 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 7 hotels

  • 45 hotels

  • 25 hotels

  • 12 hotels

92 hotels in this place

Warsaw is both the capital of Poland and, with 1.7 million inhabitants, its largest city. It's on the River Vistula (Polish: Wisła), roughly equidistant (350 km, 217 mi) from the Baltic Sea (Bałtyk) in the north and the Carpathian Mountains (Karpaty) in the south. Warsaw's history of rapid development after ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Palace of Culture and Science
  • Old Town Square
  • Royal Castle
  • Castle Square
  • Sigismund\'s Column
  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 27 hotels

  • 12 hotels

  • 4 hotels

48 hotels in this place

Gdańsk , is a city in Poland on the Baltic Sea. It is the capital of Pomerania. Gdańsk with nearby Sopot and Gdynia are often referred as Tricity (pl: Trójmiasto). Gdańsk is considered the most beautiful city on the Baltic Sea and has magnificent architecture.

Interesting places:

  • St. Mary\'s Church
  • Gdansk Crane
  • Wybrzeze Theatre
  • Gdansk Main Town Hall
  • Arthur\'s Court
  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 6 hotels

  • 11 hotels

  • 4 hotels

23 hotels in this place

Wrocław is the largest city in Lower Silesia in Poland. It is home to 630,000 people within the city limits and the metropolitan area has a population of 1.2 million making it the largest city in Western Poland. Wrocław is also the historic capital of Silesia and it has changed hands repeatedly over the ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • St. Mary Magdalene Church
  • Wroclaw University
  • St. Elisabeth\'s Church
  • Ossolineum
  • Wroclaw Opera
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 8 hotels

  • 8 hotels

  • 2 hotels

21 hotels in this place

Poznań is the largest city in Greater Poland, in the west of Poland, and one of the largest metropoles in the whole country. Situated roughly equidistantly between Warsaw and Berlin, it serves as a major economic hub, and a centre for industry and commerce. The Poznań International Trade Fair grounds host ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Musical Instrument Museum
  • Stary Rynek
  • Poznan Town Hall
  • Poznan Archaeological Museum
  • Old Town Square
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 6 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 0 hotels

14 hotels in this place

Łódź is Poland's third biggest city, and the capital of the Łódzkie Voivodship. Contrary to most other large Polish cities, which boast impressive long histories, Łódź was created almost from scratch during the 19th century textile industry boom to house textile mills, their owners and their workers, and ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Manufaktura
  • Lodz International Fair
  • Atlas Arena
  • Slowacki Park
  • Priest\'s Mill
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 3 hotels

12 hotels in this place

Sopot is a seaside spa resort city in Poland. Sopot with two nearby cities Gdańsk and Gdynia are often referred as Tricity (Polish: Trójmiasto). It is a smallest of the three and at the same time the most affluent on average, attracting the rich and famous both from the local area (who tend to settle there) ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Sopot Beach
  • Sopot Pier
  • Aquapark Sopot
  • Forest Opera
  • Lysa Gora Ski Area
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 6 hotels

  • 1 hotels

11 hotels in this place

Katowice is the largest city in Upper Silesia and Poland's main industrial centre. A rich cultural life with theatres, the Silesian Museum and Philharmonic Orchestras and the famous Spodek concert hall caters for a population of about 320,000 in the city itself and over 2.1 million if the surrounding cities ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Silesian Theatre
  • Jerzy Zietek Rondo
  • Silesian Museum
  • Altus Tower
  • Spodek
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 0 hotels

9 hotels in this place

Zakopane is a very popular winter resort and summer getaway town in the Tatra mountains at the southern tip of Poland. It became a climatic health resort and as well as cultural spot in the 1880s. Many Polish writers and artists visited Zakopane at the turn of 20th century. Stanisław Witkiewicz developed so ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Tatra Museum
  • Wielka Krokiew
  • Morskie Oko
  • Villa Koliba
  • Giewont Mountain
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 0 hotels

7 hotels in this place

Bydgoszcz (germ. Bromberg) is the capital city of the Kuyavian-Pomeranian Voivodeship. It is located in northern Poland, on the Brda and Vistula rivers, with a population of roughly 360 000, agglomeration more than 460 000, which makes it the 8th biggest city in Poland. Bydgoszcz is part of the metroplex ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Old Market Square
  • Bydgoszcz Oncology Center
  • Zawisza Stadium
  • Ogrod Fauny Polskiej Zoo
panoramio Photos are copyrighted by their owners

States in Poland

  • 1 hotels

  • 5 hotels

  • 25 hotels

  • 115 hotels

  • 53 hotels

  • 10 hotels

209 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 8 hotels

  • 51 hotels

  • 29 hotels

  • 12 hotels

103 hotels in this place

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 6 hotels

  • 38 hotels

  • 20 hotels

  • 7 hotels

72 hotels in this place

Popular cities:

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 6 hotels

  • 13 hotels

  • 9 hotels

  • 1 hotels

29 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 9 hotels

  • 11 hotels

  • 4 hotels

27 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 8 hotels

  • 8 hotels

  • 2 hotels

21 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 8 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 0 hotels

16 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 6 hotels

  • 0 hotels

11 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 0 hotels

9 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

4 hotels in this place

Popular cities:

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 0 hotels

4 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 1 hotels

4 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

3 hotels in this place

Popular cities:

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

3 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

3 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

0 hotels in this place

panoramio Photos are copyrighted by their owners

Points of Interest in Poland

Ever since Poland joined the European Union, international travellers have rapidly rediscovered the country's rich cultural heritage, stunning historic sites and just gorgeous array of landscapes. Whether you're looking for architecture, urban vibes or a taste of the past: Poland's bustling cities and towns offer something for everyone. If you'd rather get away from the crowds and enjoy nature, the country's vast natural areas provide anything from dense forests, high peaks and lush hills to beaches and lake reserves.

Cities

Most of the major cities boast lovely old centres and a range of splendid buildings, some of them World Heritage sites. Many old quarters were heavily damaged or even destroyed in WWII bombings, but were meticulously rebuilt after the war, using the original bricks and ornaments where possible. Although remains of the Soviet Union and even scars of the Second World War are visible in most of them, the Polish cities offer great historic sight seeing while at the same time they have become modern, lively places. The capital, Warsaw, has one of the best old centres and its many sights include the ancient city walls, palaces, churches and squares. You can follow the Royal Route to see some of the best landmarks outside the old centre. The old city of Kraków is considered the country's cultural capital, with another gorgeous historic centre, countless monumental buildings and a few excellent museums. Just 50 km from there is the humbling Auschwitz concentration camp which, due to the horrible events it represents, leaves an impression like no other World Heritage site does. The ancient Wieliczka salt mine is another great daytrip from Kraków.

Once a Hanseatic League-town, the port city of Gdańsk boasts many impressive buildings from that time. Here too, a walk along the Royal Road gives a great overview of notable sights. Wrocław, the former capital of Silesia, is still less well-known but can definitely compete when it comes to amazing architecture, Centennial Hall being the prime example. Its picturesque location on the river Oder and countless bridges make this huge city a lovely place. The old town of Zamość was planned after Italian theories of the "ideal town" and named "a unique example of a Renaissance town in Central Europe" by UNESCO. The stunning medieval city of Toruń has some great and original Gothic architecture, as it is one of the few Polish cities to have escaped devastation in WWII. Other interesting cities include Poznań and Lublin.

Natural attractions

With 23 national parks and a number of landscape parks spread all over the country, natural attractions are never too far away. Białowieża National Park, on the Belarus border, is a World Heritage site for it comprises the last remains of the primeval forest that once covered most of Europe. It's the only place where European Bisons still live in the wild. If you're fit and up for adventure, take the dangerous Eagle's Path (Orla Perć) in the Tatra Mountains, where you'll also find Poland's highest peak. Pieniński National Park boasts the stunning Dunajec River Gorge and Karkonoski National Park is home to some fabulous water falls. The mountainous Bieszczady National Park has great hiking opportunities and lots of wild life. Wielkopolski National Park is, in contrast, very flat and covers a good part of the pretty Poznań Lakeland. The Masurian Landscape Park, in the Masurian Lake District with its 2000 lakes, is at least as beautiful. Bory Tucholskie National Park has the largest woodland in the country and has a bunch of lakes too, making it great for birdwatching. The two national parks on Poland's coast are also quite popular: Wolin National Park is located on an island in the north-west, Słowiński National Park holds some of the largest sand dunes in Europe.

Castles & other rural monuments

The Polish countryside is lovely and at times even gorgeous, with countless historic villages, castles, churches and other monuments. Agrotourism is therefore increasingly popular. If you have a taste for cultural heritage, the south western parts of the country offer some of the best sights, but there's great stuff in other areas too. The impressive Gothic Wawel Castle in Kraków may be one of the finest examples when it comes to Poland's castles, but most of the others are located in smaller countryside towns. The large, red brick Malbork castle (in northern Poland) is perhaps the most stunning one in the country, built in 1406 and today the world's biggest brick Gothic castle. The castle of Książ in Wałbrzych is one the best examples in historic Silesia, which also brought forward the now semi-ruined Chojnik castle, located on a hill above the town of Sobieszów and within the Karkonoski National Park. After surviving battles and attacks for centuries, it was destroyed by lightning in 1675 and has been a popular tourist attraction since the 18th century. The picturesque Czocha Castle near Lubań originates from 1329. A bit off the beaten track are the ruins of Krzyżtopór castle, in a village near Opatów. The Wooden Churches of Southern Lesser Poland are listed by UNESCO as World Heritage, just like the Churches of Peace in Jawor and Swidnica. The Jasna Góra Monastery in Częstochowa and the beautiful, World Heritage listed Kalwaria Zebrzydowska park are famous pilgrimage destinations. The lovely Muskau Park in Łęknica, on the German border, has fabulous English gardens and is a UNESCO listing shared with Germany.

St. Mary\'s Church - Gdansk

Palace of Culture and Science - Warsaw

St. Mary Magdalene Church - Wroclaw

Archaelogical Museum of Krakow - Krakow

Musical Instrument Museum - Poznan

Sopot Beach - Sopot

Chrobry Embankment - Szczecin

Old Market Square - Bydgoszcz

Rynek Staromiejski - Torun

Rynek - Lublin

Malbork Castle - Malbork

Zamosc Cathedral - Zamosc

Royal Castle - Warsaw

Old Town Square - Warsaw

Castle Square - Warsaw

Old Town Market Place - Warsaw

Sigismund\'s Column - Warsaw

Church of St. Wojciech - Krakow

Town Hall Tower - Krakow

St. Mary\'s Basilica - Krakow

panoramio Photos are copyrighted by their owners

NEWSLETTER SIGNUP:

UPCOMING EVENT:

loading...

Loading...