Malaysia

  • 24 hotels

  • 10 hotels

  • 743 hotels

  • 624 hotels

  • 194 hotels

  • 51 hotels

1646 hotels in this place

Malaysia is a country in Southeast Asia, located partly on a peninsula of the Asian mainland and partly on the northern third of the island of Borneo. West (peninsular) Malaysia shares a border with Thailand, is connected by a causeway and a bridge (the 'second link') to the island state of Singapore, and has coastlines on the South China Sea and the Straits of Malacca. East Malaysia (Borneo) shares land/maritime borders with Brunei, Indonesia and the Philippines.

Population: 29,628,392 people
Area: 329,847 km2
Highest point: 4,100 m
Coastline: 4,675 km
Life expectancy: 74.28 years
GDP per capita: $17,200
Sort by:

No rooms are available for given criteria.

Sort by:

Interactive map

interactive map

Welcome to our interactive map!

Accommodation

Room 1:
Child age:

Filter the result


Legend

Hotels

  • 5 star hotels 5 star hotel
  • 4 star hotels 4 star hotel
  • 3 star hotels 3 star hotel
  • 2 star hotels 2 star hotel
  • 1 star hotels 1 star hotel

Cities

  • Metropolis over 100 hotels
  • Big city 50-100 hotels
  • Medium city 20-50 hotels
  • Small city 5-20 hotels
  • Village below 5 hotels

Points of Interest

  • Beach Beach
  • Business object Business object
  • Casino Casino
  • Civic property Civic property
  • Education Education
  • Entertainment Entertainment
  • Golf course Golf course
  • Green space Green space
  • Harbor Harbor
  • Historic site Historic site
  • Interesting place Interesting place
  • Medical Medical
  • Monument Monument
  • Museum Museum
  • Shopping Shopping
  • Skiing Skiing
  • Sports facility Sports facility
  • Theater Theater
  • Winery Winery

About Malaysia

History

Before the rise of the European colonial powers, the Malay peninsula and the Malay archipelago were home to empires such as the Srivijaya, the Majapahit (the latter in Indonesia) and the Malacca Sultanate. The Srivijaya and Majapahit empires saw the spread of Hinduism to the region, and to this day, despite being nominally Muslim, many Hindu legends and traditions survive in traditional Malay culture. Mass conversion to Islam only occurred after the arrival of Arab traders during the Malacca Sultanate.

During the 16th century the Portuguese established the first European colony in Southeast Asia by defeating the Malacca Sultanate. The Portuguese subsequently then lost Malacca to the Dutch. The British also established their first colony on the Malay peninsula in Penang when it was ceded by the Sultan of Kedah in 1786. Finally, the area was divided into Dutch and British spheres of influence with the signing of the Anglo-Dutch Treaty in 1824. With this treaty, the Dutch agreed to cede Malacca to the British and in return, the British ceded all their colonies on Sumatra to the Dutch. The line of division roughly corresponds to what is today the border between Malaysia and Indonesia.

Before World War II, the Malay Peninsula was governed by the British as the Federated Malay States (Selangor, Perak, Negeri Sembilan and Pahang), which were governed as a single entity, the Unfederated Malay States (Johor, Kedah, Perlis, Terengganu and Kelantan), which were each governed as separate protectorates, and the Straits Settlements (including Malacca, Penang and Singapore), which were crown colonies. Northern Borneo consisted of the British colony of North Borneo, the Kingdom of Sarawak, which was ruled by a British family known as the "White Rajas", and the British protectorate of Brunei.

World War II was disastrous for the British Malayan Command. The Japanese swept down both coasts of the Malay Peninsula and despite fierce fighting, much of the British military was tied down fighting the Germans in Europe and those that remained in Malaya simply could not cope with the Japanese onslaught. The British military equipment left to defend Malaya were outdated and no match for the modern ones used by the Japanese, while the only two battleships based in the region, the HMS Prince of Wales and HMS Repulse, were sank by Japanese bombers off the East Coast of Malaya. By 31 January 1942, the British had been pushed all the way back to Singapore, which also fell to the Japanese on 15 February 1942. The situation was no different on Borneo, which fell to the Japanese on 1 April 1942 after months of fierce fighting. The Japanese occupation was brutal, and many, particularly the ethnic Chinese, suffered and perished during the occupation. Among the most notorious atrocities committed by the Japanese was the Sandakan Death Marches, with only six out of several thousand prisoners surviving the war.

After World War II, the Federated Malay States, Unfederated Malay States and the Straits Settlements of Malacca and Penang were federated to form a single British colony known as the Malayan Union, with Singapore splitting off to form a separate colony. In the Malayan Union, the sultans of the various states ceded all their powers except those in religious affairs to the British crown. However, widespread opposition to the Malayan Union led the British to reconsider their position, and in 1948, the Malayan Union was replaced by the Federation of Malaya, in which the executive positions of the sultans were restored. In Borneo, the White Rajas ceded Sarawak to the British crown in 1946, making it a crown colony of the United Kingdom.

On 31 August 1957, Malaya gained independence from the British. At midnight, the Union Jack was lowered, and the Malayan flag raised in its place at what is today Dataran Merdeka (Independence Square) in Kuala Lumpur. The crowd, led by the first Prime Minister of Malaya, Tunku Abdul Rahman, then proceeded to chant "Merdeka" seven times. On 16 September 1963, Malaysia was formed through the merging of Malaya with the British colonies of North Borneo (now known as Sabah), Sarawak and Singapore, with Brunei deciding not to join. On 9 August 1965 Singapore was officially expelled from the federation after several bloody racial riots as its majority Chinese population and the People's Action Party, led by Lee Kuan Yew (later the long-ruling Prime Minister of Singapore), were seen as a threat to Malay dominance. The first several years of the country's history were marred by the Indonesian confrontation (konfrontasi) as well as claims to Sabah from the Philippines.

Climate

The climate in Malaysia is tropical. The north-east monsoon (October to February) deluges Borneo and the east coast in rain and often causes flooding, while the west coast (particularly Langkawi and Penang) escape unscathed. The milder south-west monsoon (April to October) reverses the pattern. The southern parts of peninsular Malaysia, including perennially soggy Kuala Lumpur, are exposed to both but even during the rainy season, the showers tend to be intense but brief.

Malaysia is close to the equator, therefore warm weather is guaranteed. Temperatures generally range from 32°C (90ºF) at noon to about 26°C (79ºF) at midnight. But like most Southeast Asian countries, Malaysia's sun-shining days are interrupted by Monsoon season from November and February every year, and night temperatures can hit a low of about 23°C (73ºF) on rainy days.

Temperatures tend to be cooler in the highlands, with the likes of Genting Highlands,Cameron Highlands and Fraser's Hill having temperatures ranging from about 17°C (62ºF) at night to about 25°C (77ºF) in the day. Mount Kinabalu is known to have temperatures falling below 10°C (50ºF).

Geography

Malaysia comprises two geographic regions, Peninsular Malaysia and East Malaysia, which are separated by the South China Sea.

Peninsular Malaysia (Semenanjung Malaysia) occupies all of the Malay Peninsula between Thailand and Singapore, and is also known as West Malaysia (Malaysia Barat) or the slightly archaic Malaya (Tanah Melayu). It is home to the bulk of Malaysia's population, its capital and largest city Kuala Lumpur, and is generally more economically developed. Peninsular Malaysia consists of plains on both the East and West coasts, separated from each other by a mountain range known as the Banjaran Titiwangsa.

Separated some 800 km to the east of Peninsular Malaysia is East Malaysia (Malaysia Timur). East Malaysia occupies the northern third of the island of Borneo, shared with Indonesia and tiny Brunei. Much of the development on East Malaysia is centred around the cities Kuching, Miri and Kota Kinabalu. Outside of the major cities and smaller towns are impenetrable jungle where head hunters once roamed and coastal plains rising to mountains. East Malaysia is rich in natural resources and is very much Malaysia's hinterland for industry and tourism.

Activities

Malaysia has excellent scuba diving. The most popular spots are the islands off the East Coast of peninsular Malaysia (Perhentian, Redang, Tioman and many more), although the dive season is limited to April to September. However, the most famous dive site — often ranked among the best in the world — is Sipadan, off the easternmost tip of Malaysian Borneo. There are many other less well known sites, like Layang Layang.

Whitewater Rafting

You can find tame Grade I to incredibly difficult and dangerous Grade V rapids in Malaysia's many national parks:

  • Jeram Besu - Grade I-III - Pahang
  • Telom River - Grade V - Pahang
  • Kuala Perahu - Pahang
  • Lipis River - Pahang
  • Anak Jelai River - Grade I-II - Pahang
  • Tembeling River - Grade I-II - Pahang
  • Sedim River - Grade III-IV - Kedah
  • Sungai Selangor - Grade I-III - Selangor
  • Kiulu River - Grade II - Sabah
  • Padas River - Grade III-IV - Sabah
  • Sungai Itek (Kampar River) - Grade I-III - Perak
  • Sungkai River - Grade I-II - Perak
  • Singoh River - Grade V - Perak
  • Endau River - Johor
  • Nenggiri River - Grade I-III Kelantan
  • Kuala Kubu Bahru, Selangor

Food

The crossroads of Malay, Chinese and Indian cuisine, Malaysia is an excellent place to makan (eat in Malay). Look out for regional specialities and Nyonya (Peranakan) cuisine, the fusion between Malay and Chinese cooking. There is even unique Eurasian cooking to be found in the Portuguese Settlement in Malacca, the heartland of the Eurasian community of Portuguese descent.

Malaysians are very proud of their cooking and most towns or even villages have their own delicious specialities such as Penang char kway teow, Kajang satay, Ipoh bean sprout chicken, Sarawak laksa, Kelantanese nasi dagang, Sabahan hinava, and many, many more. Most of them rely on word of mouth for advertising and are frequently located in the most inconvenient, out-of-the-way places so you might want to try asking the locals for their personal recommendations.

If you intend to travel around Malaysia trying out the local food, don't be fooled by the names. Sometimes two entirely different dishes from different parts of the country can be known by the same name. An example will be laksa, which refers to completely different noodle dishes in Penang and Sarawak.

Generally, you can eat pretty much anywhere in Malaysia. Food outlets are comparatively clean - the only thing you should avoid is ice for your drinks, when you frequent the street or hawker stalls since the blocks of ice used there might not be up to your hygienic standards. In actual restaurants this is not a problem. Also you might want to avoid ordering water from hawker stalls or the mamak restaurants as they are usually unboiled tap water.

Cheaper places often do not display prices; most will charge tourists honestly, but check prices before ordering to make sure.

Eating habits run the gamut, but most foods are eaten by fork and spoon: push and cut with the fork in the left hand, and eat with the spoon in the right.

As eating is a favourite 'pastime' of Malaysians, the majority are adept at using chopsticks, regardless of background. Noodles and Chinese dishes typically come with these, while Malay and Indian food can be eaten by hand, but nobody will blink an eye if you ask for a fork and spoon instead.

If eating by hand, always use your right hand to put your food in your mouth, as Malays and Indians traditionally use their left hand for dirty things like washing up after using the restroom. When eating with chopsticks at Chinese restaurants, take note of the usual etiquette and most importantly, do not stick your chopsticks vertically into a bowl of rice. This is reminiscent of incense sticks burning at the temple and has connotations of wishing death on those around you. If eating in a group, serving dishes are always shared, but you'll get your own bowl of rice and soup.

Local delicacies

Malay cuisine

Subtlety is not a priority in Malaysian Malay cooking, as it is characterised by a liberal use of spices (the most important are star anise, cinnamon/cassia, cardamom and cloves - dubbed rempah empat beradik or the four spice siblings), pungent edible rhizomes (mainly galangal, ginger and turmeric), coconut milk (santan in Bahasa Malaysia), and occasionally fresh herbs (lemongrass, fresh coriander, pandan leaves and various kinds of wild herbs or ulam). Most Malaysian Malay dishes are curries, stews or dips of one kind or another, but all full of flavour.

  • Nasi lemak (lit. "fatty rice") is the definitive Malaysian Malay breakfast, consisting at its simplest of rice cooked in light coconut milk or coconut cream, some fried ikan bilis (anchovies), peanuts, slices of cucumber and a dab of chilli on the side. Originally, the 'ikan bilis' was cooked together with the chilli & spices to make "sambal tumis ikan bilis" but it makes more commercial sense to the business man to have them separated as it is easier to make & the fried anchovies will last longer. A larger fried fish or chicken wing are common accompaniments. More often than not, also combined with a variety of curries and/or sambal (see below).
  • Rendang, occasionally dubbed "dry curry", is meat stewed for hours on end in an intricately spiced (but rarely fiery) curry paste until almost all water is absorbed. Beef rendang is the most common, although relatively recent variations with chicken and mutton are not uncommon.
  • Sambal is the generic term for chilli-based sauces of many kinds. Sambal belacan is a common condiment made by mixing chilli with the shrimp paste belacan, while the popular dish sambal sotong consists of squid (sotong) cooked in red chilli sauce. Sambal ikan bilis, a common accompaniment to nasi lemak, consists of small dried fish with onions, chilli and sugar.
  • Satay are barbecued skewers of meat, typically chicken or beef. What separates satay from your ordinary kebab is the slightly spicy peanut-based dipping sauce.
  • Kangkung belacan is water spinach wok-fried in shrimp paste (belacan) and hot chilli peppers.
  • Mee rebus is egg noodles served in a sweet and slightly spicy sweet potato-based gravy, usually with a slice of hard boiled egg and some lime.
  • Lontong is vegetables, tempeh and soohoon cooked in a yellow (from turmeric) coconut-based gravy, eaten with nasi himpit (cubed overcooked rice)-- one of the few vegetarian dishes in Malay cuisine!
  • Acar (achar) is thinly sliced vegetables and fruits (cucumber, carrot, pineapple) lightly pickled with vinegar, chilli and peanuts, a common side dish. Not nearly as pungent as Indian-style pickles which happen to bear the same name.
  • Sup kambing is a hearty goat or mutton soup slow simmered with aromatic herbs and spices, and garnished with fried shallots and fresh cilantro.
  • Keropok lekor, a speciality of the state of Terengganu on the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia, is a savoury cake made from a combination of batter and shredded fish. Sliced and fried just before serving, it is eaten with hot sauce.
  • Tempoyak is fermented durian paste, served as a side accompaniment to a main meal.
Malay desserts

Malaysian Malay desserts, especially the sweet pastries and jellies, are mostly based on coconut and palm sugar (gula melaka, named after Melaka). Kuih (or kueh) refer to a plethora of steamed cake-like sweetmeats, mostly made with coconut milk, grated coconut flesh, glutinous rice or tapioca. Labour-intensive to make, they are often very colorful (made so with either natural or synthetic food colourings), and cut into fanciful shapes. Try the onde-onde, small round balls made from glutinous rice flour that has been coloured and flavoured with pandan leaves, filled with palm sugar and rolled in grated coconut. A delight to eat as it pops in your mouth with a sweet sensation of oozing palm syrup.

  • Ais kacang literally means "ice bean" in Bahasa Malaysia, or in another name of ABC means Air Batu Campur, is a good clue to the two major ingredients: shaved ice and red adzuki beans. However, more often than not you'll also get gula melaka (palm sugar), grass jelly, sweet corn, kidney beans, black eyed peas, attap palm seeds and anything else on hand thrown in, and the whole thing is then drizzled with canned condensed milk or coconut cream and colored syrups. The end result tastes very interesting and refreshing.
  • Apam balik, also called "Terang Bulan" in some states, is a rich pancake-like dish slathered with liberal amounts of butter or margarine, and sprinkled with sugar, coarse nut and sometimes corn.
  • Bubur cha-cha consists of cubed yam, sweet potato and sago added into a pandan-infused coconut milk soup. This can be served warm or cold and can be a breakfast or a dessert.
  • Cendol is made with green pea noodles, served in a sweet broth of palm sugar and coconut milk. Usually served chilled, and a great respite in the sweltering tropical heat.
  • Pisang goreng literally means fried bananas, encased in batter. A common street food, it can be eaten for afternoon tea, dessert, or as a snack anytime of the day.
  • Pulut Hitam is a rice pudding made from black glutinous rice sweetened with brown palm sugar. Creamy coconut milk is swirled over the rice pudding before it is served.
  • Pulut Inti is a kind of rice cake made from glutinous rice & coconut milk. It is steamed and topped with fresh grated coconut sweetened with palm sugar. It is traditionally wrapped in banana leaves folded into a pyramid shape.
  • Sago gula melaka is a simple sago pudding served with gula melaka (palm sugar) syrup and coconut milk.


Peranakan/Nonya cuisine

The most identifiable cuisine in the region is Peranakan or Nonya cuisine, born from the mixed Malay and Chinese communities of what were once the British colonies of the Straits Settlements (modern-day Singapore, Penang and Malacca).

  • Ayam pongteh is a chicken dish flavoured with fermented soy bean paste, dark soy sauce, sugar and other ingredients. This mild and slightly sweet is made daily in some Nyonya households.
  • Ayam Buah Keluak is a distinctive dish combining chicken pieces with black nuts from the Pangium edule or kepayang tree to produce a rich sauce.
  • Chilli crab originally a Malaysian specialty which is now available in Singapore as well, is a whole crab ladled with oodles of sticky, tangy chilli sauce. Notoriously difficult to eat but irresistibly delicious: don't wear a white shirt! For a less messy but equally tasty alternative, ask for black pepper crab.
  • Enche Kabin are bite-sized pieces of fried chicken marinated in soy sauce, five-spice powder, black pepper, ginger and scallions.
  • Itek Tim is a soup containing duck, tomatoes, green peppers, salted vegetables, and preserved sour plums simmered gently together.
  • Kaya is a jam-like spread made from egg and coconut, an odd-sounding but tasty combination. Served on toast for breakfast, canonically accompanied by runny eggs and strong, sweet coffee (kopi).
  • Laksa in Malaysia comes in many wildly different styles, and every state seems to have its signature style. Laksa lemak is a fragrant soup of noodles in a coconut-based curry broth, topped with cockles or shrimp, while Penang's assam laksa is made with a tamarind-infused broth instead of coconut, and has a spicy sourish taste. Kelantanese laksam, on the other hand, comes with wide, flat rice noodles and a very coconutty broth.
  • Mee siam is rice flour noodles served with sour gravy made from tamarind, dried shrimp and fermented beans. Usually served with tau pok (bean curd) cubes and hard boiled eggs.
  • Popiah or spring rolls come fresh or fried. They consist of boiled turnips, fried tofu, fried shallots and garlic, chopped omelette, chopped stir fried long beans and (optional) chilli sauce, wrapped in a thin rice skin covering and eaten like a fajita.
  • Rojak means a mixture of everything in Bahasa Malaysia, and there are two very different types. Chinese rojak is a salad of pineapple, white turnip, cucumber, tau pok (fried bean curd) with thin tiny slices of bunga kantan (torch ginger flower buds), tossed in shrimp paste sauce and sugar, then sprinkled with crushed peanuts. Indian rojak consists of mainly fried fritters made from flour and various pulses with cucumber and tofu, with sweet & spicy peanut sauce.

Chinese cuisine

Chinese food as eaten in Malaysia commonly originates from southern China, particularly Fujian and Guangdong. While authentic fare that is relatively unchanged from its Mainland Chinese origins is certainly available, especially in fancier restaurants, the daily fare served on the streets has absorbed a number of tropical touches, most notably the fairly heavy use of chilli and belachan (shrimp paste) as condiments. Noodles can also be served not just in soup (湯 tang), but also "dry" (干 kan), meaning that your noodles will be served tossed with chilli and spices in one bowl, and the soup will come in a separate bowl.

  • Bak chor mee(肉脞麵)is essentially noodles with minced pork, tossed in a chilli-based sauce with lard, ikan bilis (fried anchovies), vegetables and mushrooms.
  • Bak kut teh (肉骨茶), lit. "pork bone tea", is a simple-sounding soup of pork ribs simmered for hours in broth until they're ready to fall off the bone. It's typically eaten with white rice, mui choy (pickled vegetables) and a pot of strong Chinese tea, hence the name — the broth itself doesn't contain any tea. To impress the locals, order some you tiao fritters from a nearby stall and cut them up into bite-sized chunks to dip into your soup. The port town of Klang is said to be original home of the dish.
  • Char kui teow (炒果条) is a favourite noodle type at Penang. Some flat egg noddle fried with soya source, prawn, cockles, bean sprouts, chives & bak you (Pork's Oil), though this last ingredient is sometimes absent due to the popularity & demand of this dish from the Malays & Indians who traditionally shun pork.
  • Chee cheong fun (豬腸粉) is a favorite breakfast consisting of lasagna-type rice noodles rolled up and various types of fried meats including fishballs and fried tofu. The dish is usually topped with a generous amount of sauce.
  • Chwee kway (水粿) is a dish consisting of rice cakes topped with chai po (salted fermented turnips), usually served with some chilli sauce.
  • Fish ball noodles (魚丸麵) come in many forms, but the type most often seen is mee pok, which consists of flat egg noodles tossed in chilli sauce, with the fishballs floating in a separate bowl of soup on the side.
  • Hainanese chicken rice (海南鸡饭) is poached chicken served with rice cooked in chicken stock and fat, and tasty ginger and chilli dipping sauces. The chicken has a delicate taste, but it's the quality of the rice and the dipping sauces that connoseurs get passionate about. Perhaps better known in Singapore, there is an interesting local variant found in Malacca and Muar, Johor, with the rice cooked until it is sticky and rolled into balls.
  • Hokkien mee (福建麵) refers to at least three separate dishes. In Kuala Lumpur, this gets you thick noodles fried in dark soy sauce, while in Penang you'll get a very spicy shrimp soup. Interestingly, neither of them bear any resemblance to the dish of the same name served in neighbouring Singapore.
  • Kway chap (粿汁) is essentially sheets made of rice flour served in some brownish soup, accompanied by a plate of braised pork and pig organs (usually intestines).
  • Lok-lok (乐乐) consists of skewers of fish, meat and vegetables, cooked in boiling broth and eaten with sauces, the most popular being the "kuah kacang", which interestingly is a Malay sauce made from peanuts & traditionally served with satay and ketupat (compressed rice cubes eaten during Eid).
  • Steamboat (火鍋), also known as hot pot, is do-it-yourself soup Chinese style. You get a pot of broth bubbling on a tabletop burner, pick meat, fish and veggies to your liking from a menu or buffet table, then cook it to your liking. When finished, add in noodles or ask for rice to fill you up. This usually requires a minimum of two people, and the more the merrier.
  • Wantan mee (雲吞麵) is thin noodles topped with wantan dumplings of seasoned minced pork. Unlike the soupy Hong Kong version, it is usually served dry.
  • Yong tau foo (酿豆腐) literally means "stuffed tofu", but it's more exciting than it sounds. The diner selects their favorites from a vast assortment of tofu, fish paste, seafood and vegetables and they are then sliced into bite-size pieces, cooked briefly in boiling water and then served either in broth as soup or "dry" with the broth in a separate bowl. The dish can be eaten by itself or with any choice of noodles. Essential accompaniments are spicy chili sauce and a distinctive brown sweet sauce for dipping.

Indian cuisine

The smallest of Malaysia's 'Big 3', the Indians have had a disporportionately large impact on the culinary scene, with the mamak (Indian Muslim, see below) stall having acquired in every Malaysian city and town, and nasi kandar restaurants offering a wide variety of these to ladle onto your rice. Authentic Indian food in Malaysia includes typical South Indian specialties such as dosai, idli, sambhar, uttapam; as well as some north Indian meals like naan bread, korma, and tandoori chicken. In addition, however, a number of Indian dishes have been "Malaysianized" and adopted by the entire population, including:

  • Fish head curry is, true to the name, a gigantic curried fish head cooked whole until it's ready to fall apart. The head itself is not eaten, as there's plenty of meat to be found inside and all around. Note that there are two distinct styles, the fiery Indian and the milder Chinese kind (the latter is sometimes served as a broth for vermicelli noodles).
  • "Mamak-style" mee goreng is a ubiquitous dish found at mamak stalls, a stir-fried noodle dish loved by Malaysians.
  • Nasi briyani (sometimes spelled nasi beriani) is assembled by layering the flavorful rice with tender pieces of spiced-cooked lamb, mutton or chicken. At nasi kandar restaurants, it refers to rice that is cooked without the meat, and is merely a choice of rice [instead of plain steamed rice] to eat with your selection of curries and side dishes.
  • Roti canai is the Malaysian adaptation of the South Indian parotta, flat bread tossed in the air like pizza, fried in oil, and eaten dipped in curry. Eaten plain with sides of dal gravy, curry sauce or both, it is usually dubbed "roti kosong". Variations include include roti telur (with egg) and murtabak (stuffed with chicken, mutton or fish), roti boom (with condensed milk) and roti tisu (made very thin like tissue paper, and laced with caramelized sugar).
  • Putu mayam is composed of vermicelli-like rice noodles usually mixed with shredded coconut and some jaggery.

East Malaysia

East Malaysia, especially Sarawak, also offers a wide range of local dishes, but these are very rarely seen in peninsular Malaysia. See Sarawak#Eat for details.

Where to eat

The cheapest places to eat are hawker stalls and coffeeshops, known as kedai kopi in Bahasa Malaysia or kopitiam in Chinese. These shops sell, besides coffee, many other types of food and drinks. Particularly popular and tasty are mamak stalls, run by Indian Muslims and serving up localized Indian fare like roti canai. Most hawker stalls stay open till late and some even operate on shifts so you can find the same stall offering different food at different points throughout the day. You can also do take away from any stall, just ask for bungkus (Bahasa Malaysia) or ta pao (Chinese). A hawker meal will rarely cost you over RM5. Hygiene standards in Malaysia, while not up to that of neighbouring Singapore or Western countries, is still reasonable and much better than say, China or most of the rest of Southeast Asia. Just be observant, and generally speaking, if a stall is patronised by locals, it should be safe to eat there.

One step up on the scale is the kedai makanan or the more Western-style restoran. A type to look out for is the nasi kandar restaurant (also known as nasi campur or nasi padang), with a vast range of curries and toppings to ladle on top of your rice.

Seafood restaurants (makanan laut) are comparatively pricy but still excellent value by most standards; do check prices before ordering though. Local prawns are gigantic, Chinese-style steamed fish is a treat and crab served with sticky chilli sauce is particularly popular.

Last but not least, some less adventurous options. Food courts in shopping malls are a good way to sample local delicacies in air-conditioned comfort, paying only a small premium over hawker prices. And yes, you can also find McDonalds, KFC, Pizza Hut and the usual suspects plus imitators throughout Malaysia.

Dietary restrictions

Being a Muslim-majority country, finding halal food in Malaysia is easy, but most Chinese stalls and restaurants are not halal. Ask if in doubt. Meals at Malay restaurants and Western fast food restaurants like McDonalds, Kentucky Fried Chicken, Pizza Hut are halal. Restaurants at major hotels are not certified 'Halal' as they serve alcohol as well, but they generally don't serve pork. Local Muslims will eat at Western, Chinese and Indian eateries if there is a halal sign on the walls. Most of the restaurants tend to display their halal certification or halal sign on their places. Halal certification is awarded and enforced by a government agency, usually JAKIM.

Vegetarianism is well-understood by the Chinese and Indian communities (not so by the Muslim Malays and other indigenous minorities) and many restaurants or hawker stalls will be able to come up with something on request (DO state "no meat, no fish, no seafood - ASK for vegetables and/or eggs ONLY"), but don't rely entirely on menu descriptions: innocuous-seeming dishes like "fried vegetables" etc. will often contain pork bits, shrimp paste (belacan, commonly used in Malay and spicy Chinese dishes), fish sauce, etc. Indian restaurants usually have very good vegetarian selections - the roti (Indian flat bread - any kind; including roti canai, roti naan, capati, tosai) are good choices, and DO insist on being given dhal (lentil-based curry dip) lest you'll be given a fish curry dip. Purely vegetarian Chinese restaurants (often serving remarkable "mock meat" products made from tofu, gluten etc.) are quite easy to find in big urban areas with a large ethnic Chinese population. Getting vegetarian food in rural areas, especially those near fishing villages or in Muslim/Malay-dominated regions, may be more difficult, but learning some basic Bahasa Malaysia vocabulary will go a long way to help you get your message across — see the Malay phrasebook. Upmarket Western restaurants, such as those serving Italian cuisine will normally have some good vegetarian options.

Veganism is rarely understood in this part of the world and is largely mistaken as a synonym for vegetarianism, yet the safest bet for a vegan is to patronize a Chinese Buddhist vegetarian restaurant (most Chinese vegetarian restaurants are essentially vegan and operated on Buddhist principles of non-killing and compassion, and thus they abstain from using dairy products, eggs, and the 5 fetid vegetables [onions, garlic, leeks, etc.] discouraged in Mahayana Buddhism). And if you're still feeling uneasy or unsure, do not hesitate to ask.

Drinks

Malaysians like both coffee (kopi) and tea (teh), especially the national drink teh tarik ("pulled tea"), named after the theatrical 'pulling' motion used to pour it. By default, both will be served hot, sweet and with a dose of condensed milk; request teh o to skip the milk, teh ais for iced milky tea, or teh o ais for iced milkless tea. Drinking with no sugar at all is considered odd, but asking for kurang manis (less sugar) will ease the pain. However, if you really want no sugar at all, you can try asking for "teh kosong."

Another peculiar local favourite is the kopi tongkat ali ginseng, a mixture of coffee, a local aphrodisiacal root, and ginseng served with condensed milk that's touted as an alternative to viagra and red bull combined and is usually advertised with a picture of a bed broken in half.

Other popular nonalcoholic options include the chocolate drink Milo and lime juice (limau). Freshly made fruit juices are also widely available, as well as a wide range of canned drinks (some familiar, some less so).

Topically and, perhaps, politically incorrect, is a local drink comprised of white soya milk and black grass jelly (cincau) called a Michael Jackson and can be ordered at most hawker centre and local roadside cafes ("mamak")

Alcohol

Although Malaysia has a Muslim majority, alcohol is available on licensed outlet for the consumptions of its non-Muslim citizens (Chinese and Indian) & visitors. However, some states (notably Kelantan and Terengganu) ban the use of alcohol. With the exception of tax-free islands (Labuan, Langkawi, Tioman) and duty free shops (for example in Johor Bahru), prices are comparatively high, with a can of beer costing RM7.50 or more even in supermarkets or 7-Eleven store. However, in East Malaysia, smuggled liquors are widely available.

In East Malaysia, particularly Sarawak, tuak is a common affair for any celebration or festivals such as Gawai Dayak and Christmas Day. Tuak is made from fermented rice which sometimes sugar, honey or other various condiments are added. It is normally served lukewarm without ice. Visitors can choose from 'strong' flavour of tuak (which is normally being fermented for years), or 'mild' flavour (which sometimes just being prepared a week or even a day before). In Sabah, cheap liquors are very widely available at most supermarkets and mini markets in the state. Other alcoholic drinks such as beer and whisky are also widely available. On the other hand, Tuak in Kelantan is also can be considered as a liquor since that it contains trace amount of fermented nipah or sap juice. The alcohol content in Kelantan tuak can easily reach 50% after 3 days from the time it was extracted.

Tapai, consists of cassava that is fermented and eaten as a food (though the liquid in the bottom can also be drunk).

Shopping

The Malaysian currency is the Malaysian ringgit, abbreviated as RM or MYR, divided into 100 sen (cents). The ringgit is sometimes informally referred to as the dollar and you may see the '$' symbol on older notes. There are coins of RM0.05 (silver), RM0.10 (silver), RM0.20 (silver or gold), and RM0.50 (silver or gold) as well as bills of RM1 (blue), RM5 (green), RM10 (red), RM20 (orange), RM50 (green/blue) and RM100 (purple). 5 sen coins are mainly given as change in large establishments or supermarkets whereas peddlers and street vendors might be reluctant to accept them. Note that the Singapore and Brunei dollars are also known as ringgit in Malay, so when near border areas you might want to check to be sure which currency they are quoting the price in.

Foreign currencies are not generally accepted, although you might get away with exchanging some US dollars or Euros even in more remote areas, but do expect a lot of stares and some persuasion. The major exception is Singapore dollars, which are accepted by KTMB and toll roads, but at a highly unfavorable 1:1 exchange rate (an anomaly dating back to when the ringgit was interchangeable with the Singapore dollar, prior to the 1970s).

Currency exchange counters can easily found in major shopping areas and have a better exchange rate than in banks and airports. Be sure to say the amount you wish to exchange and ask for the 'best quote' as rates displayed on the board are often negotiable, especially for larger amounts. Be advised that large foreign banknotes, such as €500, are almost impossible to change for a good rate in some areas, especially in Sabah or Sarawak, where the banks offer a much lower rate comparing to the one you'd get if changing a banknote of smaller amount. Some money exchangers in Kota Kinabalu or Kuching even may refuse your business if you have large foreign banknotes, so the best option is to bring smaller notes unless you are willing to shop around.

ATMs are widely available in cities, but do stock up on cash if heading out into the smaller islands or the jungle. Credit cards can be used in most shops, restaurants and hotels, although skimming can be a problem in dodgier outlets.

Banking

Banks in Malaysia do handle international transactions. These ranges from a nominal fee if you are an account holder to a slightly more expensive amount if you are only walking in to use a certain service. International banks such as Citibank & HSBC have their presence in Malaysia, with the latter having branches throughout the country. Local banking giants are Maybank & CIMB Bank, & they are a very good alternative to the earlier mentioned banks, especially in terms of pricing, local knowledge & presence as well as international services available e.g. money transfers. For any enquiries and transactions, get a number, sit down and wait for your turn to be served. (There is no need to queue while you wait in air-conditioned comfort!)

Banks are open Monday-Friday from 09:30-16:00 and selected banks are open Saturday 09:30-11:30 except on the first and third Saturdays of each month. In the states of Kedah, Kelantan and Terengganu, they are open Saturday-Wend 09:30-16:00 and Thursday 09:30-11:30.

Due high levels of fraud, many Malaysian ATMs do not allow you to withdraw using foreign debit cards. Numerous travellers have noted this on travel forums. Choosing another ATM or area can help so don't run down your cash supplies too far. This is unique to Malaysia and is not applicable to Thailand, Singapore, or Indonesia. If you call your bank or even Visa/MasterCard, they are often not aware because the transaction is declined by the Malaysia bank. Make sure to bring cash or other form of money in case your debit card is rejected.

Costs

Most visitors will find Malaysia quite cheap, although it is noticeably more expensive than neighbouring Thailand and Indonesia. You can live in hostel dorms and feast on hawker food for less than RM50 per day, but you'll wish to double this for comfort, particularly if travelling in more expensive East Malaysia. Kuala Lumpur is also generally more expensive than the rest of the country. At the other end of the spectrum, luxury hotels and air fares are comparatively affordable, with even the fanciest 5-star hotels costing less than RM400/night.

Tipping is not customary in Malaysia. However, hotel porters and taxi drivers will appreciate a small tip if you have been provided with exemplary service. Most expensive restaurants, bars and hotels may indicate prices in the form of RM19++, meaning that sales tax (6%) and service charge (10%) will be added to the bill. Hotel tax of 5% may also be added to this.

Shopping

Kuala Lumpur is a shopping mecca for clothes, electronics, watches, computer goods and much more, with very competitive prices by any standard. Local Malaysian brands include Royal Selangor and British India. Traditional Malaysian fabrics (batik) are a popular souvenir. The cheapest place to easily buy ethnic souvenirs (especially wood-based) is in Kuching, East Malaysia, and the most expensive place is in the major, posh Kuala Lumpur shopping centres.

In general shops are open 10:30-21:30/22:00 in the large cities. They open and close for business earlier in the smaller towns and rural areas. Some shops may also be closed on certain days, such as in Malacca where many shops and restaurants close on Tuesday.

If you buy too much while shopping in Malaysia (which is quite easy to do), surface postage rates are very reasonable. Excess luggage at the airport is still high but not as high as in many other countries. Check first with your airline.

This article is based on Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike 3.0 Licensed text from the article Malaysia on Wikivoyage.

Cities in Malaysia

  • 3 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 136 hotels

  • 122 hotels

  • 48 hotels

  • 22 hotels

334 hotels in this place

Kuala Lumpur, or simply called KL by locals, is the federal capital and the largest city in Malaysia. Literally meaning muddy river confluence in Malay, Kuala Lumpur has grown from a small sleepy Chinese tin-mining village to a bustling metropolis of around 6.5 million (city-proper population of 1.8 million) ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Petronas Twin Towers
  • Jamek Mosque
  • Central Market
  • Sultan Abdul Samad Building
  • Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre
  • 2 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 88 hotels

  • 67 hotels

  • 26 hotels

  • 3 hotels

190 hotels in this place

Georgetown is the capital of the island and state of Penang, on the west coast of peninsular Malaysia. It is listed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site, together with fellow former Straits Settlement, Malacca.

Interesting places:

  • Cheong Fatt Tze Mansion
  • Kapitan Keling Mosque
  • St. George\'s Church
  • Goddess of Mercy Temple
  • Leong San Tong Khoo Kongsi
  • 1 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 69 hotels

  • 51 hotels

  • 10 hotels

  • 2 hotels

135 hotels in this place

Malacca is a small state in southern part of the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia. It is located between Johor and Negeri Sembilan.

Interesting places:

  • Christ Church
  • The Stadthuys
  • St Paul\'s Church
  • A Famosa
  • Kampung Keling Mosque
  • 3 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 77 hotels

  • 33 hotels

  • 7 hotels

  • 5 hotels

125 hotels in this place

Langkawi,(Jawi:لانكاوي ) officially known as Langkawi, the Jewel of Kedah (Malay: Langkawi Permata Kedah) is an archipelago of 99 islands (an extra 5 temporary islands are revealed at low tide) in the Andaman Sea, some 30 km off the mainland coast of northwestern Malaysia. The islands are a part of the state ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Eagle Square
  • Kuah Jetty
  • Langkawi Sky Bridge
  • Rice Museum Langkawi
  • Cenang Mall
  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 60 hotels

  • 40 hotels

  • 10 hotels

  • 1 hotels

113 hotels in this place

The capital of the state of Sabah located on the island of Borneo, this Malaysian city is a growing resort destination due to its proximity to tropical islands, lush rain forest and Mount Kinabalu. Constantly referred to as KK, it is located on the west coast of Sabah within the West Coast Division. KK is one ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Centre Point
  • Wisma Merdeka
  • Kota Kinabalu Central Market
  • KK Plaza
  • Atkinson Clock Tower
  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 23 hotels

  • 29 hotels

  • 7 hotels

  • 0 hotels

61 hotels in this place

Johor Bahru (also Johor Baru or Johore Baharu, but universally called JB) is the state capital of Johor in southern peninsular Malaysia, just across the causeway from Singapore. A bustling city and a significant regional transport and manufacturing hub, it has little of interest for the casual tourist.

Interesting places:

  • Johor Bahru Old Chinese Temple
  • Johor Bahru City Square
  • Sultan Ibrahim Building
  • Istana Pasir Pelangi
  • Istana Besar
  • 1 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 25 hotels

  • 23 hotels

  • 7 hotels

  • 0 hotels

57 hotels in this place

Kuching is the capital and largest city of the East Malaysian state of Sarawak and the district of Kuching, as well as the largest city on the island of Borneo.

Interesting places:

  • Tua Pek Kong
  • Chinese History Museum
  • Fort Margherita
  • Hills Shopping Mall
  • Tun Jugah Shopping Center
  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 20 hotels

  • 21 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 2 hotels

46 hotels in this place

Ipoh is the state capital of Perak, on the west coast of peninsular Malaysia. It is the country's fourth largest city and a gateway to the Cameron Highlands.

Interesting places:

  • Night Market
  • Cactus Point
  • Sam Poh Tong Temple
  • Kek Lok Tong
  • Raju Hill Strawberry Farm
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 21 hotels

  • 5 hotels

  • 10 hotels

  • 1 hotels

37 hotels in this place

Petaling Jaya, universally referred to as PJ, is a satellite city in the state of Selangor to the west of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It attained city status in 2006 on the auspicious day of June 20 (hence 20-06-2006!).

Interesting places:

  • Wat Chetawan Temple
  • 1 Utama
  • Centre Point
  • Curve Shopping Mall
  • Kota Darul Ehsan Arch
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 8 hotels

  • 12 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

22 hotels in this place

Sandakan, is in Sabah, Borneo. It is the gateway to Sepilok Orangutan Sanctuary and the Labuk Bay Proboscis Monkey Sanctuary.

Interesting places:

  • Sandakan Harbour Mall
  • Sepilok Orang Utan Sanctuary
  • Agnes Keith House
  • Rainforest Discovery Centre
  • Turtle Islands Park (Taman Negara Pulau Penyuh)
  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 10 hotels

  • 5 hotels

  • 1 hotels

20 hotels in this place

Port Dickson is a popular beach destination in the state of Negeri Sembilan, Peninsular Malaysia. About 60 kilometers from Kuala Lumpur, Port Dickson, or PD to locals, is about an hour's drive from Kuala Lumpur along the North-South Highway and about 32 km from Seremban.

Interesting places:

  • Port Dickson Mini Zoo
  • Admiral Cove Marina
  • Cape Rachado Lighthouse
  • Port Dickson Ostrich Farm
  • Fort Lukut
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 14 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

20 hotels in this place

Kota Bharu is the state capital of Kelantan, on the east coast of peninsular Malaysia. Many travellers simply pass through on their way to the Perhentian Islands, but those who spend a few days in KB have the chance to go to some of the museums mentioned below, eat some delicious food, look at a unique style ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Siti Khadijah Central Market
  • Sultan Mohammad IV Stadium
  • State Museum
  • Cahaya Bulan Beach
  • Chinese Beijing Mosque
  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 8 hotels

  • 7 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

18 hotels in this place

Kuala Terengganu is the state capital of Terengganu, on the east coast of peninsular Malaysia.

Interesting places:

  • Istana Maziah
  • Crystal Mosque
  • Sultan Ismail Nasiruddin Shah Stadium
  • Floating Mosque
  • Terengganu State Museum
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 10 hotels

  • 7 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

18 hotels in this place

The Cameron Highlands is situated in Pahang, West Malaysia. It is approximately 85 km from Ipoh or about 200 km from Kuala Lumpur. The retreat has a diverse population of more than 43,000 people.

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 7 hotels

  • 8 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

15 hotels in this place

The Cameron Highlands is situated in Pahang, West Malaysia. It is approximately 85 km from Ipoh or about 200 km from Kuala Lumpur. The retreat has a diverse population of more than 43,000 people.

Interesting places:

  • Kea Farm
  • Boh Tea Plantation
  • Cameron Highland Golf Club
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 7 hotels

  • 7 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

15 hotels in this place

Sepang is a district in the Malaysian state of Selangor. It is located 50 km south of Kuala Lumpur. Most visitors head to Sepang to get to the Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KLIA) and Sepang Formula One circuit are located within the district. The district centre is Bandar Baru Salak Tinggi. Sepang is ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Sepang International Circuit
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 11 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

15 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 1 hotels

13 hotels in this place

Shah Alam is the state capital of Selangor, Malaysia.

Interesting places:

  • Shah Alam Blue Mosque
  • Taman Lake Park
  • Shah Alam Stadium
  • Bukit Raja Shopping Centre
  • Saujana Golf and Country Club
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 5 hotels

  • 5 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

11 hotels in this place

Alor Star is the state capital of Kedah, on the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia. It is arguably the state capital on the west coast of Peninsular Malaysia that is richest in Malay culture. Despite the development and being the state capital, tourists are able to enjoy the scenic view of paddy plantations ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Balai Besar
  • Zahir State Mosque (Masjid Zahir)
  • Nobat Gallery (Balai Nobat)
  • Kedah Royal Museum (Muzium Diraja Kedah)
  • Kedah State Art Gallery (Balai Seni Negeri)
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 6 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

11 hotels in this place

Klang, also spelled Kelang, is the royal town of Selangor, on the west coast of peninsular Malaysia before Shah Alam. The town is named after the Klang River, which cuts the town in half, and sits at the western end of the Klang Valley.

Interesting places:

  • i-City
  • Royal Gallery
  • Raja Mahadi Fort
  • Gedung Raja Abdullah Tin Museum
  • Istana Alam Shah
  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 5 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

10 hotels in this place

Ranau is located in Sabah, Malaysian Borneo.

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 0 hotels

10 hotels in this place

Miri is a small city in northern Sarawak on the Malaysian island of Borneo. It has a population of about 300,000.

Interesting places:

  • Imperial Shopping Mall
  • Marina Beach
  • Bintang Plaza
  • Niah National Park
  • Taman Selera
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 5 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 0 hotels

10 hotels in this place

Subang Jaya is an affluent suburban city of Klang Valley, across the state line in Selangor to the west of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It consists of the Subang Jaya (SS12-SS19) on the Northern end of the city, USJ on the Southern end, Bandar Sunway, Batu Tiga and Putra Heights. The city is a much sought after ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Sunway Pyramid Mall
  • Empire Shopping Gallery
  • Subang Parade
  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 7 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

9 hotels in this place

Subang Jaya is an affluent suburban city of Klang Valley, across the state line in Selangor to the west of Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. It consists of the Subang Jaya (SS12-SS19) on the Northern end of the city, USJ on the Southern end, Bandar Sunway, Batu Tiga and Putra Heights. The city is a much sought after ... (read more)

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 5 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

9 hotels in this place

Bintulu is a part coastal, part riverine town, and the capital of Bintulu District (7,220.4 square kilometers) in the Bintulu Division of Sarawak, Malaysia. It is approximately 624 km away from Kuching and about 215 km from either Sibu or 205 km from Miri. It is a home to about 200,000 inhabitants. Bintulu is ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Assyakirin Commerce Square
  • Similajau National Park
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 7 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

8 hotels in this place

Kuala Lumpur, or simply called KL by locals, is the federal capital and the largest city in Malaysia. Literally meaning muddy river confluence in Malay, Kuala Lumpur has grown from a small sleepy Chinese tin-mining village to a bustling metropolis of around 6.5 million (city-proper population of 1.8 million) ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • World of Phalanopsis Orchid Farm
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 6 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

8 hotels in this place

The Golden Triangle is Kuala Lumpur's main shopping and nightlife district. Considered to be the closest thing to a CBD, the Golden Triangle is home to the ever popular shopping area of Bukit Bintang. To the north is KLCC, a multi-purpose development known for its shopping and the Petronas Twin Towers. Whilst ... (read more)

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 5 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

7 hotels in this place

Genting Highlands — pronounced ghen-ting with a hard "G" — is in Pahang, Peninsular Malaysia.

Interesting places:

  • First World Plaza
  • Genting Theme Park
  • Chin Swee Cave Temple
  • Genting Skyway
  • Genting Strawberry Leisure Farm
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 5 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

7 hotels in this place

Interesting places:

  • Pulau Payar Marine Park
  • Central Square
  • Farmers Golf Club
  • Semeling Jetty
  • Ulu Legong Hot Springs
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 0 hotels

7 hotels in this place

Tioman is a small island, 39 km long and 12 km wide, located off the east coast of peninsular Malaysia.

Interesting places:

  • Kampung Juara Beach
  • Asah Waterfall
  • Tioman Marine Park
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

6 hotels in this place

The third largest town of the state of Sabah, situated on the island of Borneo. It is a relatively new town in Malaysia, boomed in early 1980s for its lumber and cocoa farming industry. Today Tawau is a bustling town where it is a transit point to all neigbouring islands such Sebatik, Nunukan, Tarakan, Jolo ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Tawau Hills Park
  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

6 hotels in this place

Cherating is a popular beach resort area in Pahang. It is located about 30 km north of Kuantan on Peninsular Malaysia's East Coast. Cherating village is a typical small lazy East Coast fishing village although backpacker-tourism now is the major income earner here. The village, which is just off the main East ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Cherating Beach
  • Cherating Turtle Sanctuary
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

6 hotels in this place

Taiping is a town in Perak state, Malaysia.

Interesting places:

  • Bukit Merah Jetty
  • Bukit Merah Lake Park
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

6 hotels in this place

Butterworth is the main town on the mainland side of Penang state in Malaysia. Smaller, more industrial and practical, Butterworth does not have any of the atmosphere which Georgetown across the Penang Straits has. However, it is an important transportation hub for all train and many bus services which do not ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Sultan Abdul Halim Ferry Terminal
  • Ninth Emperor God Temple
  • Mengkuang Dam
  • Negeri Pulau Pinang Stadium
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 3 hotels

5 hotels in this place

Putrajaya, an "Intelligent Garden City" and the federal administrative capital of Malaysia, is a showcase city under construction some 30 km south of the capital Kuala Lumpur. Her adjacent sister city, Cyberjaya, is built along the same lines, but is aimed at attracting the IT industry. The area was formerly ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Putra Mosque
  • Putrajaya Independence Square
  • Perdana Putra
  • Palace of Justice
  • Putra Bridge
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

5 hotels in this place

Sibu is a town in Sarawak, East Malaysia.

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

5 hotels in this place

Pangkor Island is in Perak, on the west coast of peninsular Malaysia, about 100 km west of Ipoh and halfway between Kuala Lumpur and Penang.

Interesting places:

  • Coral Beach
  • Teluk Nipah Beach
  • Moon Beach
  • Dutch Fort
  • Kali Amman Temple
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

5 hotels in this place

Seberang Jaya is a satellite township in Penang.

Interesting places:

  • Penang Bridge East End
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

5 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

5 hotels in this place

The Perhentian Islands are a small group of islands approximately approximately 10 nautical miles (19 km) off the north-eastern coast of West Malaysia in the state of Terengganu. The islands are protected as part of the Pulau Redang National Marine Park.

Interesting places:

  • Perhentian Beach
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

4 hotels in this place

Bandar Baru Bangi is a township in Selangor.

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 0 hotels

4 hotels in this place

Redang is an island which lies about 45 km off the coast of Terengganu state in Malaysia.

Interesting places:

  • Berjaya Beach
  • Redang Mosque
  • Redang Beach
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

4 hotels in this place

Interesting places:

  • Pantai Hospital
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

4 hotels in this place

Kajang is a city in Selangor.

Interesting places:

  • Aeon Cheras Selatan Shopping Centre
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

4 hotels in this place

Putrajaya, an "Intelligent Garden City" and the federal administrative capital of Malaysia, is a showcase city under construction some 30 km south of the capital Kuala Lumpur. Her adjacent sister city, Cyberjaya, is built along the same lines, but is aimed at attracting the IT industry. The area was formerly ... (read more)

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

4 hotels in this place

Lumut is a small town in Perak, on the west coast of Malaysia, almost exactly halfway between Kuala Lumpur and Penang. It is the gateway to the island of Pangkor.

Interesting places:

  • Lumut Jetty
  • Teluk Batik Beach
  • Damai Laut Jetty
  • Damai Laut Beach
  • Damai Laut Golf and Country Club
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

4 hotels in this place

Labuan, the Pearl of Borneo, is a Federal Territory of Malaysia. It comprises one large and six smaller islands in East Malaysia.

Interesting places:

  • Labuan Bird Park
  • Chimney of Labuan
  • Labuan Golf Club
  • Labuan International Sea Sport Complex
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

4 hotels in this place

Interesting places:

  • Sutra Beach
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

3 hotels in this place

Kajang is a city in Selangor.

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

3 hotels in this place

Sepang is a district in the Malaysian state of Selangor. It is located 50 km south of Kuala Lumpur. Most visitors head to Sepang to get to the Kuala Lumpur International Airport (KLIA) and Sepang Formula One circuit are located within the district. The district centre is Bandar Baru Salak Tinggi. Sepang is ... (read more)

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

3 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 3 hotels

3 hotels in this place

The capital of the state of Sabah located on the island of Borneo, this Malaysian city is a growing resort destination due to its proximity to tropical islands, lush rain forest and Mount Kinabalu. Constantly referred to as KK, it is located on the west coast of Sabah within the West Coast Division. KK is one ... (read more)

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 0 hotels

3 hotels in this place

Interesting places:

  • Legoland Malaysia
  • Puteri Harbour Family Theme Park
  • Nusajaya Centre
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

2 hotels in this place

Muar is the second biggest town and district of the state of Johor in southern Malaysia. Muar is at 2°3′N 102°34′E, at the north-east of the state. Muar is also known by its other name, Bandar Maharani, which means Empress Town.

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

2 hotels in this place

Interesting places:

  • Belum Jetty
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

2 hotels in this place

Sibu Island is an island off the eastern coast of Johor, Malaysia.

Interesting places:

  • Pulau Sibu Tengah Dock
  • Palau Papan Beach
  • Kambau Beach
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

2 hotels in this place

Kulim is a city in Kedah.

Interesting places:

  • Landmark Central Shopping Centre
  • Putra Lake Park
  • Sedim Tree Top Walk
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

2 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

2 hotels in this place

Interesting places:

  • Kepala Batas Golf Club
  • Allanze University - College of Medical Sciences
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

2 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

2 hotels in this place

Bayan Lepas is a town in Penang, Malaysia. The area makes up the south-east region of Pulau Pinang and includes the mid-way town of Gelugor, which separates Bayan Lepas and Georgetown, along with Batu Muang at the south-eastern tip of the island.

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

2 hotels in this place

Interesting places:

  • Pulau Beach
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

2 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

2 hotels in this place

Kuala Selangor is a town in Selangor State. Literally, Kuala means rivermouth in the Malay language, and thus this is a small town where the Selangor River (Sungai Selangor) meets the sea. It was the old royal capital of Selangor prior to moving to Klang, and finally to Kuala Lumpur. This small town was ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Kuala Selangor Nature Park
  • Bukit Belimbing Fireflies
  • Bukit Melkwati
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

2 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

2 hotels in this place

Interesting places:

  • Pulau Tiga Park
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

2 hotels in this place

Interesting places:

  • Desaru Beach
  • Fisherman Museum
  • Sebana Golf Resort
  • Tanjung Balau Beach
  • Desaru Fruit Farm
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

2 hotels in this place

Pangkor Island is in Perak, on the west coast of peninsular Malaysia, about 100 km west of Ipoh and halfway between Kuala Lumpur and Penang.

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

2 hotels in this place

Sungai Pelek is a small town in Sepang district which offered some pleasant surprises. The dragon fruit farm and plenty of traditional Foochew delights make this place worth a visit.

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

1 hotels in this place

Interesting places:

  • Kelantan Beach
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

1 hotels in this place

Bukit Tinggi is a area in Pahang, Malaysia, near Janda Baik.

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

1 hotels in this place

Interesting places:

  • Batang Ai National Park
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

1 hotels in this place

Interesting places:

  • Gemia Beach
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

1 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

1 hotels in this place

Interesting places:

  • Palau Tinggi Jetty
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

1 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

1 hotels in this place

Langkawi,(Jawi:لانكاوي ) officially known as Langkawi, the Jewel of Kedah (Malay: Langkawi Permata Kedah) is an archipelago of 99 islands (an extra 5 temporary islands are revealed at low tide) in the Andaman Sea, some 30 km off the mainland coast of northwestern Malaysia. The islands are a part of the state ... (read more)

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

1 hotels in this place

Gua Musang is a small town deep in the jungles of central Kelantan. While it has little of interest in itself, it's a convenient gateway for Taman Negara and a good place to break the cross-peninsula haul.

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

1 hotels in this place

Interesting places:

  • Tanjung Jara Beach
  • Bukit Bauk Forest Reserve
  • Golf Desa Dungun
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

1 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

1 hotels in this place

Gunung Mulu National Park (Taman Negara Gunung Mulu, ) is in Sarawak on the island Borneo, near the border with Brunei.

Interesting places:

  • Gunung Buda National Park
  • Pulong Tau National Park
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

1 hotels in this place

The capital of the state of Sabah located on the island of Borneo, this Malaysian city is a growing resort destination due to its proximity to tropical islands, lush rain forest and Mount Kinabalu. Constantly referred to as KK, it is located on the west coast of Sabah within the West Coast Division. KK is one ... (read more)

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

1 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

1 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

0 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

0 hotels in this place

Interesting places:

  • Irama Beach
  • Wat Phothikyan Phutthantham
  • Bachok Pool
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

0 hotels in this place

Bukit Tinggi is a area in Pahang, Malaysia, near Janda Baik.

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

0 hotels in this place

Interesting places:

  • Paka Beach
  • Paka Market
  • Paka Mosque
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

0 hotels in this place

Kuantan is the state capital of Pahang, on the east coast of Peninsular Malaysia.

panoramio Photos are copyrighted by their owners

Points of Interest in Malaysia

Malaysia is a fascinating country with many faces. It's multi-ethnic and multi-cultural, and its attractions vary from the iconic Petronas Towers in bustling Kuala Lumpur to perfect sandy beaches lined with palm trees and dense jungles with orangutangs and tigers.

There are various impressive national parks. Expeditions range from those where you hardly lose sight of the hotel to those where you are fully immersed in the jungle for weeks, with only the guide and yourself. To spot a tiger or wild elephant in its natural habitat you might have to spend more than a few days in the wild, but you'll have no trouble seeing smaller wildlife. Bako National Park is the oldest national park in Malaysia and one of the best places to see proboscis monkeys. The vast jungles of Taman Negara have become a popular destination for ecotourists, just like the remote but gorgeous Gunung Mulu National Park, a World Heritage Site famous for its limestone karst formations, stone pinnacles and huge caves. To escape from the muggy tropics, do as the English did and head up to the cool tea plantations of the Cameron Highlands or climb Mount Kinabalu in Sabah.

For many people, Malaysia brings pictures of pristine beaches with great diving opportunities to mind - and for good reason. Sipadan off the coast of Sabah, and the beautiful Perhentian Islands are among the best (and most popular) places. Coastlines in the less industrialized parts of the country, in general, are well worth driving through for their natural beauty and relaxing seaside kampung (villages). Follow the crowds to the postcard perfect sands of the Langkawi Islands, where you can have a cocktail on the beach and stay in one of the many resorts.

If you're most interested in taking the pulse of a city, don't miss Kuala Lumpur's crazy quilt ultra-modern skyline, including the famous Petronas Twin Towers. Ipoh is a good choice if you enjoy a somewhat slower paced city that features elegant colonial-era buildings from about 100 years ago, and Malacca is for those who want to trace the colonial and imperial history of Malaysia several hundred years further back. Penang is known for its great food and relatively long-standing and institutionalized Chinese and Indian communities, who share the city with Malay and Thai communities. For a completely different experience, head to Kota Bharu to discover a unique conservative Islamic regional culture influenced by Thailand, only a few kilometres away, or visit the diverse cities of East Malaysia, like Kuching and Kota Kinabalu. Especially when travelling with children, consider visiting one of the country's excellent zoos, such as Taiping Zoo, Kuala Lumpur's Zoo Negara and Malacca's Zoo.

Petronas Twin Towers - Kuala Lumpur

Christ Church - Malacca

Cheong Fatt Tze Mansion - Penang

Centre Point - Kota Kinabalu

Putra Mosque - Putrajaya

Tua Pek Kong - Kuching

First World Plaza - Genting Highlands

Eagle Square - Langkawi

Johor Bahru Old Chinese Temple - Johor Bahru

Istana Maziah - Kuala Terengganu

Siti Khadijah Central Market - Kota Bharu

Jamek Mosque - Kuala Lumpur

Central Market - Kuala Lumpur

Sultan Abdul Samad Building - Kuala Lumpur

The Stadthuys - Malacca

St Paul\'s Church - Malacca

Kuala Lumpur Convention Centre - Kuala Lumpur

Sri Mahamariamman Temple - Kuala Lumpur

Petronas Philharmonic Hall - Kuala Lumpur

Suria KLCC Shopping Centre - Kuala Lumpur

panoramio Photos are copyrighted by their owners
loading...

Loading...