India

  • 82 hotels

  • 18 hotels

  • 1018 hotels

  • 2856 hotels

  • 704 hotels

  • 192 hotels

4870 hotels in this place

India is the largest country in the Indian Subcontinent and shares borders with Pakistan to the north-west, China and Nepal to the north, Bhutan to the north-east, and Bangladesh and Myanmar to the east. Sri Lanka lies to the south, Maldives to the south-west and Indonesia to the south-east of India in the Indian Ocean. It is the seventh largest country in the world, and with over a billion people, India is the 2nd most populous country in the world, standing behind China. It's an extremely diverse country, with vast differences in geography, climate, culture, language and ethnicity, and prides itself on being the largest democracy on Earth. (less...) (more...)

Population: 1,220,800,359 people
Area: 3,287,263 km2
Highest point: 8,598 m
Coastline: 7,000 km
Life expectancy: 67.48 years
GDP per capita: $3,900
Sort by:

No rooms are available for given criteria.

Sort by:

Interactive map

interactive map

Welcome to our interactive map!

Accommodation

Room 1:
Child age:

Filter the result


Legend

Hotels

  • 5 star hotels 5 star hotel
  • 4 star hotels 4 star hotel
  • 3 star hotels 3 star hotel
  • 2 star hotels 2 star hotel
  • 1 star hotels 1 star hotel

Cities

  • Metropolis over 100 hotels
  • Big city 50-100 hotels
  • Medium city 20-50 hotels
  • Small city 5-20 hotels
  • Village below 5 hotels

Points of Interest

  • Beach Beach
  • Business object Business object
  • Casino Casino
  • Civic property Civic property
  • Education Education
  • Entertainment Entertainment
  • Golf course Golf course
  • Green space Green space
  • Harbor Harbor
  • Historic site Historic site
  • Interesting place Interesting place
  • Medical Medical
  • Monument Monument
  • Museum Museum
  • Shopping Shopping
  • Skiing Skiing
  • Sports facility Sports facility
  • Theater Theater
  • Winery Winery

About India

History

Indians date their history from the Vedic Period which scholars place in the second and first millennia BCE continuing up to the 6th century BCE, based on literary evidence. This is the period when the Vedas, the oldest and holiest books of Hinduism, were compiled. The Vedic civilization influences India to this day. Present-day Hinduism traces its roots to the Vedas, but is also heavily influenced by literature that came afterwards, like the Upanishads, the Puranas, the great epics — Ramayana and Mahabharata, and the Bhagavad Gita. By tradition, these books claim to only expand and distill the knowledge that is already present in the Vedas. Some rituals of Hinduism took shape during that period. Most North-Indian languages come from Sanskrit, the language of the Vedas, and are classified as part of the Indo-European group of languages. In the 1st millennium BCE, various schools of thought in philosophy developed, enriching Hinduism greatly. Most of them claimed to derive from the Vedas. However, two of these schools - Buddhism and Jainism - questioned the authority of the Vedas and they are now recognized as separate religions.

Many great empires were formed between 500 BCE and 500 CE. Notable among them were the Mauryas and the Guptas. This period saw major mathematical and astronomical advancements ahead of their times. This period also saw a gradual decline of Buddhism and Jainism. The practice of Buddhism, in particular, disappeared from India's heartland, though Buddha himself was incorporated into the Hindu pantheon. Jainism continues to be practiced by a significant number who are ambivalent about whether they consider themselves Hindus or not. Hinduism itself went through significant changes. The importance of Vedic deities like Indra and Agni reduced and Puranic deities like Vishnu, Shiva, their various Avatars and family members gained prominence.

Islamic incursions started in the 8th century. Gradually the raiders started staying as rulers, and soon much of North India was ruled by Muslims. The most important of the Muslim rulers were the Mughals, who established an empire that at its peak covered almost the entire subcontinent (save the southern and eastern extremities), while the major Hindu force that survived in the North were the Rajputs. The bravery of the Rajputs in resisting invasion of their land is legendary and celebrated in ballads all over the forts of Rajasthan. Prominent among the Rajputs was Maha Rana Pratap, the ruler of Chittorgarh, who spent years in exile fighting Akbar, the third of the Mughals. Eventually, however, the Rajputs were subdued, and the Rajput-Mughal alliance remained strong till the end of the empire. This period of North India was the golden age for Indian art, architecture, and literature, producing the monumental gems of Rajasthan and the Taj Mahal. Hindi and Urdu also took root in medieval North India. During the Islamic period, some Hindus also converted to Islam. Today, some 13% of the Indian population follows Islam. Sikhism, another major religion, was established in Punjab during the Mughal period. Relations between Sikhism and the Mughals varied over time. The Golden Temple at Amritsar was built and recognised all over the world as Sikhs major pilgrimage center. By the time of its tenth Guru - Guru Gobind Singh, however, relations were hostile, primarily due to the antagonism of Aurangzeb, the most intolerant and bigoted of the Mughals. Conflict between the Sikhs and the Mughals was one of the causes for the eventual decline of the Mughal empire. The other cause was the challenge of the 'Marathas in Maharashtra, which was started by Shivaji and carried on by the Peshwas. The Marathas established a short-lived confederacy that was almost as large as the Mughal empire. Marathas lost their command over India after the third battle of Panipat, which in turn paved a way for British Colonialism.

South India followed a different trajectory, being less affected by Islamic rule. The period from 500 to 1600 CE is called the classical period dominated by great South Indian kingdoms. Prominent among them were the Chalukyas, Rashtrakutas and Vijayanagara empires who ruled from present day Karnataka and the Pallavas, Cheras, Pandyas and Cholas who ruled from present day Tamil Nadu & Kerala. Among them, the Cholas are widely recognised to be the most powerful of the South Indian kingdoms, with their territory stretching as far north as Pataliputra and their influence spreading as far east as Sumatra, Western Borneo and Southern Vietnam at the height of their power. Some of the grandest Hindu and Jain monuments that exist in India were built during this time in South and East India.

European traders started visiting India beginning in the late 16th century. Prominent among these were the British, French and the Portuguese. The British East India Company made Calcutta their headquarters in 1772. They also established subsidiary cities like Bombay and Madras. Calcutta later went onto to become 'the second city of the empire after London'. By the 19th century, the British had, one way or the other assumed political control of virtually all of India, though the Portuguese and the French too had their enclaves along the coast.

There was an uprising by Indian rulers in 1857 which was suppressed, but which prompted the British government to take over from the Company and make India a part of the empire. Many Indians converted to Christianity during the period, for pretty much the same reasons as they converted to Islam, though forcible conversions ended in British India after 1859, and Queen Victoria's proclamation promised to respect the religious faiths of Indians.

Non-violent resistance to British colonialism under Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi led to independence on 15 August 1947. However, independence was simultaneously granted to the secular state of India and the smaller Islamic state of Pakistan, and the orgy of Hindu-Muslim bloodletting that followed Partition led to the deaths of at least half a million and the migration of 12-14 million people.

India achieved self-sufficiency in food grains by the 1970s, ensuring that the large-scale famines that had been common are now history. However these policies also led to shortages, slow growth and large-scale corruption. After a balance-of-payments crisis in 1991, the country adopted free-market reforms which have continued at a meandering pace ever since, fueling strong growth. The IT and the business outsourcing industries have been the drivers for the growth, while manufacturing and agriculture, which have not experienced reforms, are lagging. About 60% of Indians live on agriculture and around 36% remain in poverty.

Relations with Pakistan have been frosty. The two countries have fought four wars, three of them over the status of Kashmir. The third war between the two countries in 1971 resulted in East Pakistan becoming Bangladesh. India continues to experience occasional terrorist attacks that are widely believed to originate in Pakistan and ordered by its military-intelligence complex.

China and India went to war in 1962 over a border dispute. Though current relations are peaceful, there is still military rivalry and no land crossings are allowed between the two countries, though one border crossing between Sikkim and Tibet was re-opened in 2006 for trade. Security concerns over Pakistan and China prompted India to test nuclear weapons twice (including the 1974 tests described as "peaceful explosions"). India wants to be accepted as a legitimate nuclear power and is campaigning for a permanent Security Council seat.

India is proud of its democratic record. Constitutional government and democratic freedoms have been safeguarded for most of its 66 years as an independent country.

Current concerns in India include the corruption, poverty, over-population, environmental degradation, ongoing disputes with Pakistan and China, terrorism, and ethnic and religious strife. But the current obsession, at least among the educated elite, is over whether India will be able overtake China in economic growth.

Climate

In India, it rains only during a specific time of the year. The season as well as the phenomenon that causes it is called the monsoon. There are two of them, the Southwest and the Northeast, both named after the directions the winds come from. The Southwest monsoon is the more important one, as it causes rains over most parts of the country, and is the crucial variable that decides how the crops will do. It lasts from June to September. The Southwest monsoon hits the west coast the most, as crossing the western ghats and reaching the rest of India is an uphill task for the winds. The western coastline is therefore much greener than the interior. The Northeast monsoon hits the east coast between October and February, mostly in the form of occasional cyclones which cause much devastation every year. The only region that gets rains from both monsoons is North-Eastern India, which consequently experiences the highest rainfall in the world.

India experiences at least three seasons a year, Summer, Rainy Season (or "Monsoon") and Winter, though in the tropical South calling the 25°C (77°F) weather "Winter" would be stretching the concept. The North experiences some extremes of heat in Summer and cold in Winter, but except in the Himalayan regions, snow is almost unheard of. November to January is the winter season and April and May are the hot months when everyone eagerly awaits the rains. There is also a brief spring in February and March, especially in North India.

Opinions are divided on whether any part of India actually experiences an Autumn, but the ancients had certainly identified such a season among the six seasons ( or ritus - Vasanta - Spring, Greeshma - Summer, Varsha - Rainy, Sharat - Autumn, Hemanta - "Mild Winter"/"late autumn", Sheet - Winter ) they had divided the year into.

Geography

Mountains, jungles, deserts and beaches, India has it all. It is bounded to the north and northeast by the snow-capped Himalayas, the tallest mountain range in the world. In addition to protecting the country from invaders, they also feed the perennial rivers Ganga, Yamuna (Jamuna) and Sindhu (Indus) on whose plains India's civilization flourished. Though most of the Sindhu is in Pakistan now, three of its tributaries flow through Punjab. The other Himalayan river, the Brahmaputra flows through the northeast, mostly through Assam.

South of Punjab lies the Aravalli range which cuts Rajasthan into two. The western half of Rajasthan is occupied by the Thar desert. The Vindhyas cut across Central India, particularly through Madhya Pradesh and signify the start of the Deccan plateau, which covers almost the whole of the southern peninsula.

The Deccan plateau is bounded by the Western Ghats (which is called Sahyadri in Maharashtra) range to the west and the Eastern Ghats to the east. The plateau is more arid than the plains, as the rivers that feed the area, such as the Narmada, Godavari and the Kaveri run dry during the summer. Towards the northeast of the Deccan plateau is what used to be a thickly forested area, which covers the states of Chhattisgarh, Jharkhand, the eastern edge of Maharashtra and the northern tip of Andhra Pradesh. This area is still forested, poverty stricken and populated by tribal people. This forest acted as a barrier to the invasion of South India.

India has a long coastline. The west coast borders the Arabian Sea and the east coast the Bay of Bengal, both parts of the Indian Ocean.

Activities

Fair and festivals

Goa Fair(carnival)-February heralds the carnival at Goa. For three days and nights the streets come alive with color. Held in mid February the weeklong event is a time for lively processions, floats, the strumming of guitars, graceful dances and of non-stop festivity. One of the more famous of the Indian Carnivals the Goa Festival is a complete sell out in terms of tourism capacities.

Surajkund Mela-(1–15 February)As spring glides in, full of warmth and vibrancy leaving the gray winter behind, Surajkund adorns itself with colorful traditional crafts of India. Craftsmen from all over the country assemble at Surajkund during the first fortnight of February to participate in the annual celebration known as the Surajkund Crafts Mela.

Holi-The Spring Festival of India, Holi - is a festival of colors. Celebrated in March or April according to the Hindu calendar, it was meant to welcome the spring and win the blessings of Gods for good harvests and fertility of the land. As with all the Hindu festivals, there are many interesting legends attached to Holi, the most popular being that of Prince Prahlad, who was a devout follower of Lord Vishnu. It is the second most important festival of India after Diwali. Holi in India is a festival of fun and frolic and has been associated with the immortal love of Krishna and Radha. The exuberance and the festivity of the season are remarkable.

Diwali-"Diwali", the festival of lights, illuminates the darkness of the New Year's moon, and strengthens our close friendships and knowledge, with a self-realization. Diwali is celebrated on a nation-wide scale on Amavasya - the 15th day of the dark fortnight of the Hindu month of Ashwin, (Oct/Nov) every year. It symbolizes that age-old culture of India which teaches to vanquish ignorance that subdues humanity and to drive away darkness that engulfs the light of knowledge. Diwali, the festival of lights even to-day in this modern world projects the rich and glorious past of India.

Pushkar Mela-Every November, the sleepy little township of Pushkar in Rajasthan, India comes alive with a riot of colors & a frenzied burst of activity during the Pushkar Fair. Very few, if at all any, fairs in the world can match the liveliness of Pushkar. Most people associate the Pushkar Fair with e world's largest camel fair. But it is much more than that.

National parks

Depending on the area and terrain National Parks provide ample opportunities to the visitors to have a close encounters with the wilds. Indian National Parks have great variety and range of attractions and activities including the observation of their flora, avifauna, and aquafauna, or witnessing various wild creatures in their natural surroundings from on foot or a viewpoint riding upon an elephant or from inside a jeep.

  • Bandhavgarh National Park- located in Umaria District, Madhya Pradesh.
  • Ranthambore National Park-located near Sawai Madhopur,
  • Kaziranga National Park- located in Golaghat, Assam.
  • Kanha National Park-located in Mandla District, Madhya Pradesh
  • Royal Chitwan National Park (Nepal)- located in South West Of Kathmandu, Nepal
  • Eravikulam National Park- located in Munnar, Kerala
  • Sasan Gir National Park - Located near Junagadh in Gujarat

Food

Indian cuisine is superb and takes its place among the great cuisines of the world. There is a good chance that you'd have tasted "Indian food" in your country, especially if you are a traveller from the West, but what India has exported abroad is just one part of its extraordinary range of culinary diversity.

Indian food has a well-deserved reputation for being hot, owing to the Indian penchant for the liberal use of a variety of spices, and potent fresh green chilis or red chilli powder that will bring tears to the eyes of the uninitiated, and found in unexpected places like sweet cornflakes (a snack, not breakfast) or even candies. The degree of spiciness varies widely throughout the country: Andhra food is famously fiery, while Gujarati cuisine is quite mild in taste.

To enjoy the local food, start slowly. Don't try everything at once. After a few weeks, you can get accustomed to spicy food. If you would like to order your dish not spicy, simply say so. Most visitors are tempted to try at least some of the spicy concoctions, and most discover that the sting is worth the trouble.

Cuisine

Cuisine in India varies greatly from region to region. The "Indian food" served by many so-called Indian restaurants in the Western hemisphere is inspired by North Indian cooking, specifically Mughlai cuisine, a style developed by the royal kitchens of the historical Mughal Empire, and the regional cuisine of the Punjab, although degree of authenticity in relation to actual Mughlai or Punjabi cooking is sometimes variable at best and dubious at worst.

North India is wheat growing land, so you have Indian breads (known as roti), including chapatti (unleavened bread), paratha (pan-fried layered roti), naan (cooked in a clay tandoori oven), puri (deep-fried and puffed up bread), and many more. A typical meal consists of one or more gravy dishes along with rotis, to be eaten by breaking off a piece of roti, dipping it in the gravy and eating them together. Most of the Hindi heartland of India survives on roti, rice, and lentils (dal), which are prepared in several different ways and made spicy to taste. Served on the side, you will usually find spiced yogurt (raita) and either fresh chutney or a tiny piece of exceedingly pungent pickle (achar), a very acquired taste for most visitors — try mixing it with curry, not eating it plain.

A variety of regional cuisines can be found throughout the North. Tandoori chicken, prepared in a clay oven called a tandoor, is probably the best-known North Indian dish, innovated by a Punjabi immigrant from present-day Pakistan during the Partition. For a taste of traditional Punjabi folk cooking, try dal makhani (stewed black lentils and kidney beans in a buttery gravy), or sarson da saag, a yummy gravy dish made with stewed mustard greens, served with makke di roti (flatbread made from maize). There's also the hearty textures and robust flavours of Rajasthani food, the meat heavy Kashmiri dishes from the valley of Kashmir, or the mild yet gratiating Himalayan (pahari) cuisine found in the higher reaches. North India also has of a variety of snacks like samosa (vegetables encased in thin pastry of a triangular shape) and kachori (either vegetable or pulses encased in thin pastry). There is also a vast constellation of sweet desserts like jalebi (deep-fried pretzel with sugar syrup- shaped like a spiral), rasmalai (balls of curds soaked in condensed milk) and halwa. Dry fruits and nuts like almonds, cashews and pistachio are used a lot, often in the desserts, but sometimes also in the main meal.

Authentic Mughal-style cooking, the royal cuisine of the Mughal Empire, can still be found and savoured in some parts of India, most notably the old Mughal cities of Delhi, Agra and Lucknow in Uttar Pradesh, and Hyderabad in Andhra Pradesh. It is a refined blend of Persian, Turkic and Subcontinent cooking, and makes heavy use of meat and spices. The names of some Mughal dishes bear the prefix of shahi as a sign of its prestige and royal status from a bygone era. Famous Mugha specialties include biryani (layered meat and rice casserole), pulao (rice cooked in a meat or vegetable broth), kebab (grilled meat), kofta (balls of mincemeat), rumali roti (flatbread whirled into paper-thin consistency), shahi tukray (saffron and cardamom-scented bread pudding).

In South India, the food is mostly rice-based. A typical meal includes sambhar (a thick vegetable and lentil chowder) with rice, rasam (a thin, peppery soup), or avial (mixed vegetables) with rice, traditionally served on a banana leaf as a plate. Seasoning in South India differs from northern regions by its ubiquitous use of mustard seeds, curry leaves, pulses, fenugreek seeds, and a variety of souring agents such as tamarind and kokum. There are regional variations too — the coastal regions make greater use of coconut and fish. In the State of Kerala, it is common to use grated coconut in everything and coconut oil for cooking, while someone from the interior could be surprised to learn that coconut oil, can in fact, be used for cooking. The South also has some great breakfast dishes like idli (a steamed cake of lentils and rice), dosa, a thin, crispy pancake often stuffed with spiced potatoes to make masala dosa, vada, a savoury Indian donut, and uttapam, a fried pancake made from a rice and lentil batter with onions and other vegetables mixed in. All of these can be eaten with dahi, plain yogurt, and chutney, a condiment that can be made from practically anything. Try the ever popular Masala Dosa, which originated from Udupi in Karnataka, in one of the old restaurants of Bangalore like CTR and Janatha in Malleswaram or Vidyarthi Bhavan in Basavangudi or at MTR near Lalbagh. South Indian cuisine is predominantly vegetarian, though there are exceptions: seafood is very popular in Kerala and the Mangalorean coast of Karnataka; and Chettinad and Hyderabad cuisines use meat heavily, and are a lot more spicier. Coffee tends to be the preferred drink to tea in South India.

To the West, you will find some great cuisine groups. Gujarati cuisine is somewhat similar to Rajastani cooking with the heavy use of dairy products, but differs in that it is predominantly vegetarian, and often sweetened with jaggery or sugar. Gujaratis make some of the best snack items such as the Dhokla and the Muthia. Mumbai is famous for its chaat, as well as the food of the small but visible Irani and Parsi communities concentrated in and around the city. The adjacent states of Maharashtra and Goa are renowned for their seafood, often simply grilled, fried or poached in coconut milk. A notable feature of Goan cooking is that pork and vinegar is used, a rare sight in the rest of India. Vindaloo originated in Goa, and is in fact traditionally cooked with pork, and in spite of its apparent popularity in Indian restaurants abroad, it is not common in India itself.

To the East, Bengali and Odishan food makes heavy use of rice, and fish due to the vast river channels and ocean coastline in the region. Bengali cooking is known for its complexity of flavor and bittersweet balance. Mustard oil, derived from mustard seeds, is often used in cooking and adds a pungent, slightly sweet flavor and intense heat. Bengalis prefer freshwater fish, in particular the iconic ilish or hilsa: it can be smoked, fried, steamed, baked in young plantain leaves, cooked with curd, eggplant and cumin seeds. It is said that ilish can be prepared in more than 50 ways. Typical Bengali dishes include maccher jhal, a brothy fish stew which literally means "fish in sauce", and shorshe ilish (cooked in a gravy made from mustard seed paste). Eastern India is also famous for its desserts and sweets: Rasgulla is a famous variant of the better-known gulab jamun, a spherical morsel made from cow's milk and soaked in a clear sugar syrup. It's excellent if consumed fresh or within a day after it is made.Sondesh is another excellent milk-based sweet, best described as the dry equivalent of ras malai.

A lot of food has also filtered in from other countries. Indian Chinese (or Chindian) is far and away the most common adaptation: most Chinese would barely recognize the stuff, but dishes like veg manchurian (deep-fried vegetable balls in a chilli-soy-ginger sauce) and chilli chicken are very much a part of the Indian cultural landscape and worth a try. The British left fish and chips and some fusion dishes like mulligatawny soup, while Tibetan and Nepali food, especially momo dumplings, are not uncommon in north India. Pizza has entered India in a big way, but chains like Pizza hut and Domino's have been forced to Indianize the pizza and introduce adaptations like paneer-tikka pizza. Remarkably, there is an Indian chain called Smokin Joe's, based out of Mumbai, which has gone and mixed Thai curry with Pizzas.

It is, of course, impossible to do full justice to the range and diversity of Indian food in this brief section. Not only does every region of India have a distinctive cuisine, but you will also find that even within a region, castes and ethnic communities have different styles of cooking and often have their signature recipes which you will probably not find in restaurants. The adventurous traveller is advised to wangle invitations to homes, try various bylanes of the city and look for food in unlikely places like temples in search of culinary nirvana.

Fruits

While there are a wide variety of fruits native to India such as the chikoo and the jackfruit, nothing is closer to an Indians' heart than a juicy ripe mango. Hundreds of varieties are found across most of its regions — in fact, India is the largest producer, growing more than half the world's output. Mangoes are in season at the hottest part of the year, usually between May and July, and range from small (as big as a fist) to some as big as a small cantaloupe. It can be consumed in its ripe, unripe as well a baby form (the last 2 predominantly in pickles). The best mango (The king of mangoes as Indians call it) to be had is the "Alphonso" or Haapoos (in Marathi) in season in April and May along the western coast of Maharashtra. Buy it from a good fruit shop in Mumbai or Mahatma Phule market (formerly Crawford market) in South Mumbai. Other fruits widely available (depending on the season) are bananas, oranges, guavas, lychees, apples, pineapple, pomegranate, apricot, melons, coconut, grapes, plums, peaches and berries.

Vegetarian

Visiting vegetarians will discover a culinary treasure that is found nowhere else in the world. Owing to a large number of strictly vegetarian Hindus and Jains, Indian cuisine has evolved an astonishingly rich menu that uses no meat or eggs. The Jains in particular practice a strict form of vegetarianism based on the principles of non-violence and peaceful co-operative co-existence: Jains usually do not consume root vegetables such as potatoes, garlic, onions, carrots, radishes, cassava, sweet potatoes and turnips., as the plant needs to be killed prior to its end of normal life cycle, in the process of accessing these . At least half the menus of most restaurants are devoted to vegetarian dishes, and by law all packaged food products in India are tagged with a green dot (vegetarian) or red dot (non-veg). Veganism however is not a well-understood concept in India, and vegans may face a tougher time: milk products like cheese (paneer), yogurt (dahi) and clarified butter (ghee) are used extensively, and honey is also commonly used as a sweetener. Milk in India is generally not pasteurized, and must be boiled before consumption.

Even non-vegetarians will soon note that due to the Hindu taboo, beef is generally not served (except in the Muslim and Parsi communities, Goa, Kerala and the North-Eastern states), and pork is also uncommon due to the Muslim population. Chicken and mutton are thus by far the most common meats used, although "buff" (water buffalo) is occasionally served in backpacker establishments. Seafood is of course ubiquitous in the coastal regions of India, and a few regional cuisines do use duck, venison and other game meats in traditional dishes.

Etiquette

In India eating with your hand (instead of cutlery like forks and spoons) is very common. There's one basic rule of etiquette to observe, particularly in non-urban India: Use only your right hand. The left hand is reserved for unhygienic uses. Don't stick either hand into communal serving dishes: instead, use the spatula with your left hand to serve yourself and then dig in. Needless to say, it's wise to wash your hands well before and after eating.

For breads for all types, the basic technique is to hold down the item with your forefinger and use your middle-finger and thumb to tear off pieces. The pieces can then be dipped in sauce or used to pick up bits before you stuff them in your mouth. Rice is more challenging, but the basic idea is to use four fingers to mix the rice in curry and pack a little ball, before you pop it in your mouth by pushing it with your thumb.

Most of the restaurants do provide cutlery and its pretty safe to use them instead of your hand.

Eating by hand is frowned on in some "classier" places. If you are provided with cutlery and nobody else around you seems to be doing it, then take the hint.

Restaurants

Indian restaurants run the gamut from roadside shacks (dhabas) to classy five-star places where the experience is comparable to places anywhere in the world. Away from the big cities and tourist haunts, mid-level restaurants are scarce, and food choices will be limited to the local cuisine, Punjabi/Mughlai, "Chinese" and occasionally South Indian.

The credit for popularizing Punjabi cuisine all over the country goes to the dhabas that line India's highways. Their patrons are usually the truckers, who happen to be overwhelmingly Punjabi. The authentic dhaba serves up simple yet tasty seasonal dishes like roti and dhal with onions, and diners sit on cots instead of chairs. Hygiene can be an issue in many dhabas, so if one's not up to your standards try another. In rural areas, dhabas are usually the only option.

In Southern India, "Hotel" means a local restaurant serving south Indian food, usually a thali—a full plate of food that usually includes a kind of bread and an assortment of meat or vegetarian dishes—and prepared meals.

Although you may be handed an extensive menu, most dishes are served only during specific hours, if at all.

Tipping is unusual outside of fancier restaurants where up to 10% is appropriate. The fancier restaurants may also levy a service charge of up to 15% apart from government taxes.

Drinks

One of the sweetest and safest beverages you can get is tender coconut water. You can almost always find it in any beach or other tourist destinations in the south. In summer (Mar-Jul), you can get fresh sugarcane juice in many places and even a lot of fresh fruit juice varieties. Be careful as fresh juice may contain many germs besides unhygienic ice. The juice vendors do not always clean their equipment properly and do not wash the fruits either.

India is famous for its Alphonso variety of mangoes, generally regarded as the King of Mangoes among connoisseurs. So do try the Alphonso mango-flavoured beverage Maaza (bottled by Coca-Cola) or Slice (bottled by PepsiCo), both of which contain about 15% Alphonso mango pulp. Both of these brands will sure provide some needed refreshment during India's scorching hot summer. Both cost about ₹30-50 for a 600 ml bottle.

As for bottled water, make sure that the cap's seal has not been broken, otherwise, it is a tell tale sign of tampering or that unscrupulous vendors reuse old bottles and fill them with tap water, which is generally unsafe for foreign tourists to drink without prior boiling. Bottled water brands like Aquafina (by PepsiCo) and Kinley (by Coca-Cola) are widely available. Local brands like Bisleri are also acceptable and perfectly safe. Tastes may vary due to the individual brands' mineral contents. At semi-urban or rural areas, it may be appropriate to ask for boiled water as well.

Tea

Everywhere you can get tea (chai in most North Indian languages) of one variety or another. Most common is the "railway tea" type: cheap (₹2-5), sweet and uniquely refreshing once you get the taste for it. It's made by brewing up tea leaves, milk, and sugar altogether in a pot and keeping it hot until it's all sold. Masala chai will also have spices added to the mix, such as cardamom, ginger, cinnamon, and black pepper. For some people, that takes some getting used to.

While Masala chai is popular in Northern and Central India, it must be noted that people in Eastern India (West Bengal and Assam) generally consume tea without spices, the English way. This is also the part of India where most tea is grown.

In South India, coffee (especially sweet "filter coffee") replaces tea as a standard beverage.

Alcohol

Drinking alcohol can either be frowned upon or openly accepted, depending on the region and religion of the area within which you are drinking. For example, Goa, Punjab, and Pondicherry tend to be more free-wheeling (and have low taxes on alcohol), while a few southern areas like Chennai are less tolerant of alcohol, and may even charge excessive taxes on it. Some states such as Gujarat are legally "dry" and alcohol cannot be bought openly there, although there is a substantial bootlegging industry.

Favorite Indian tipples include beer, notably the ubiquitous Kingfisher (a decent lager), and rum, particularly Old Monk. Prices vary by state, especially for hard liquor, but you can expect to pay ₹50-100 for a large bottle of beer and anywhere between ₹170-250 for a 750 ml bottle of Old Monk.

Indian wines, long a bit of a joke, have improved remarkably in recent years and there's a booming wine industry in the hills of Maharashtra. The good stuff is not particularly cheap (expect to pay around ₹500 a bottle) and selections are mostly limited to white wines, but look out for labels by Chateau Indage [44] or 'Sula [45].

Illegal moonshine, called tharra when made from sugar cane and toddy when made from coconuts, is widely available in some states. It's cheap and strong, but very dangerous as quality control is nonexistent, and best avoided entirely. In the former Portuguese colony of Goa you can obtain an extremely pungent liquor called fenny or feni, typically made from cashew fruits or coconuts.

Cannabis

Cannabis in its many forms — especially ganja (weed) and charas (hash) — is widely available throughout India, but they are all illegal in the vast majority of the country, and the letter of the law states that simple possession may mean years in jail.

However, in some states (notably Uttar Pradesh, Bihar, Rajasthan, Madhya Pradesh, Uttarakhand and Orissa) the one legal and socially accepted way to consume cannabis is as bhang, a low-grade preparation sold at government-licensed shops that is not only smoked, but also made into cookies, chocolate and the infamous bhang lassi, a herb-laced version of the normally innocuous yogurt drink. Bhang lassi is usually available at varying strengths, so use caution if opting for the stronger versions. It's also occasionally sold as "special lassi", but is usually easily spotted by the ₹30-50 price tag (several times higher than the non-special kinds). An important point to bear in mind is that the effects of "Bhang" are slow and heighten when consumed with something sweet. Also, first time users may want to wait a while before consuming too much in an effort to judge their tolerance.

Shopping

The currency in India is the Indian rupee (sign: ₹; code: INR) (रुपया — rupaya in Hindi and similarly named in most Indian languages, but taka in Maithili and Taakaa in Bengali and Toka in Assamese). The rupee is subdivided into 100 paise (singular: paisa). 5 rupees 75 paise would normally be written as ₹5.75.

Common bills come in denominations of ₹5 (green), ₹10 (orange), ₹20 (red), ₹50 (purple), ₹100 (blue), ₹500 (yellow) and ₹1,000 (pink). It is always good to have a number of small bills on hand, as merchants and drivers sometimes have no change. A useful technique is to keep small bills (₹10-50) in your wallet or in a pocket, and to keep larger bills separate. Then, it will not be obvious how much money you have. Many merchants will claim that they don't have change for a ₹100 or ₹500 note. This is often a lie so that they are not stuck with a large bill. It is best not to buy unless you have exact change.

The coins in circulation are 50 paise, ₹1, ₹2, ₹5, and ₹10 (recently introduced). Coins are useful for buying tea (₹5), for bus fare (₹2 to ₹10), and for giving exact change for an auto-rickshaw.

Indians commonly use lakh and crore for 100,000 and 10,000,000 respectively. Though these terms come from Sanskrit, they have been adopted so deeply into Indian English that most people are not aware that they are not standard in other English dialects. You may also find non-standard, although standard in India, placement of commas while writing numerals. One crore rupees would be written as ₹1,00,00,000, so first time you place a comma after three numerals, then after every two numerals. This format may puzzle you till you start thinking in terms of lakhs and crores, after which it will seem natural.

Changing money

The Indian Rupee is not officially convertible, and a few government-run shops will still insist on seeing official exchange receipts if you are visibly a foreigner and attempt to pay in rupees instead of hard currency. Rates for exchanging rupees overseas are often poor and importing rupees is theoretically illegal, although places with significant Indian populations (e.g. Dubai, Singapore) can give decent rates. Try to get rid of any spare rupees before you leave the country.

Outside airports, you can change your currency at any one of the numerous foreign exchange conversion units including banks.

Most ATMs will pay out ₹40,000 in each transaction. State Bank of India (SBI) is the biggest bank in India and has the most ATMs. ICICI bank has the second largest network of ATMs and accepts most of the international cards at a nominal charge. International banks like Citibank, HSBC, Barclays, Deutsche Bank, ABN Amro, and Standard Chartered have a significant presence in major Indian cities. It is always worthwhile to have bank cards or credit cards from at least two different providers to ensure that you have a backup available in case one card is suspended by your bank or simply does not work work at a particular ATM.

In many cities and towns, credit cards are accepted at retail chain stores and other restaurants and stores. Small businesses and family-run stores almost never accept credit cards, so it is useful to keep a moderate amount of cash on hand.

Maximum Retail Price - MRP

When buying factory packaged food or drinks (e.g. Lemonade, Cola etc.) always have a look for a stamp on the packaging. It will tell you the MRP (short for maximum retail price) and you can always insist on paying not more than that.

Costs

In short, India is not very expensive.But delhi is too expensive.

Mid-range to high-range travellers

₹5000, at least, needed for a decent room in a good hotel offering cable, air conditioning and a direct telephone; however, this price doesn't include a refrigerator. Food will cost at least ₹150 for a decent meal at a stall, not at a hotel), but the sky is the limit. While bus transportation will cost approximately ₹5 for a short distance of about 1 km, a taxi or rickshaw wll cost ₹22 for the same distance without air conditioning. There are radio taxis that are available at ₹20—25 per km in key Indian cities which have GPS navigation, air conditioned and accept debit/credit cards for payments. They are a very safe mode of travel. So the total for one day would be about as below:

  • Hotel: US$60 for a good place per day
  • Food: US$10 for a good meal per day
  • Travel: US$10 taxi and bus together

Total: US$80 for a couple, US$70 for a person alone

Budget travellers

Budget travel around India is surprisingly easy, with the savvy backpacker able to get by (relatively comfortably) on as little as US$25–35 per day. It is generally cheaper than South East Asia with a night in a hotel costing as little as ₹200-1,000 (though there will be probably no air conditioning or room service for this price). Beach huts in the cheaper places of Goa can cost around ₹800 per night. A meal can be bought from a street trader for as little as ₹30, though, in a restaurant expect, to pay around ₹200-300 for a beer or two. Overnight buses and trains can cost anywhere from ₹600-1,000 dependent on distance and locations, though an uncomfortable government bus (benches only) may be cheaper.

Shopping

In India, you are expected to negotiate the price with street hawkers but not in department stores and the like. If not, you risk overpaying many times, which can be okay if you think that it is cheaper than at home. In most of the big cities and even smaller towns retail chain stores are popping up where the shopping experience is essentially identical to similar stores in the West. There are also some government-run stores like the Cottage Emporium in New Delhi, where you can sample wares from all across the country in air-conditioned comfort. Although you will pay a little more at these stores, you can be sure that what you are getting is not a cheap knockoff. The harder you bargain, the more you save money. A few tries later, you will realise that it is fun.

Often, the more time you spend in a store, the better deals you will get. It is worth spending time getting to know the owner, asking questions, and getting him to show you other products (if you are interested). Once the owner feels that he is making a sufficient profit from you, he will often give you additional goods at a rate close to his cost, rather than the common "foreigner rate". You will get better prices and service by buying many items in one store than by bargaining in multiple stores individually. If you see local people buying in a store, probably. you can get the real Indian prices. Ask someone around you quietly, "How much would you pay for this?"

Also, very often you will meet a "friend" in the street inviting you to visit their family's shop. That almost always means that you pay twice as much as when you had been in the shop without your newly found friend.

Baksheesh—small bribes—is a very common phenomenon. While it is a big problem in India, doing it can ease certain problems and clear some hurdles. Baksheesh is also the term used by beggars if they want money from you and may refer to tips given those who provide you a service. Baksheesh is as ancient a part of Middle Eastern and Asian culture as anywhere else. It derives from the Arabic meaning a small gift. It refers as much to charity as to bribes.

Packaged goods show the Maximum Retail Price (MRP) right on the package. This includes taxes. Retailers are not supposed to charge more than this. Though this rule is adhered to at most places, at tourist destinations or remote places, you may be charged more. This is especially true for cold drinks like coke or pepsi, where a bottle (300 ml) is priced around ₹11-12 when the actual price is ₹10. Also, keep in mind that a surprising number of things do not come in packaged form. Do check for the authenticity of the MRP, as shopkeepers may put up a sticker of his own to charge more from you.

What to look for/buy

  • Wood Carvings: India produces a striking variety of carved wood products that can be bought at very low prices. Examples include decorative wooden plates, bowls, artwork, furniture, and miscellaneous items that will surprise you. Check the regulations of your home country before attempting to import wooden items.
  • Clothing: It depends on the state/region you are visiting. Most of the states have their speciality to offer. For example go for silk sarees if you are visiting Benaras; Block prints if you are in Jaipur
  • Paintings: Paintings come on a wide variety of media, such as cotton, silk, or with frame included. Gemstone paintings incorporate semi-precious stone dust, so they have a glittering appearance to them.
  • Marble and stone carvings: Common carved items include elephants, Hindu gods/goddesses. Compare several of the same kind. If they look too similar bargain hard, as they are probably machine made.
  • Jewellery: Beautiful necklaces, bracelets, and other jewelry are very inexpensive in India.
  • Pillow covers, bedsets: Striking and rich designs are common for pillows and bed covers.

Designer brands like Louis Vuitton, Prada, Gucci, Zara, A & F, all are available in upmarket stores.

This article is based on Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike 3.0 Licensed text from the article India on Wikivoyage.

Popular cities in India

  • 3 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 84 hotels

  • 293 hotels

  • 40 hotels

  • 28 hotels

449 hotels in this place

Delhi is India's capital and the home of the executive, legislative, and judiciary branches of Government. Delhi is known as the microcosm of India and is a leading world city with strengths in arts, commerce, education, entertainment, fashion, finance, healthcare, media, professional services, research and ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Humayun\'s Tomb
  • Qutub Minar
  • India Gate
  • Palika Bazaar
  • Jama Masjid
  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 58 hotels

  • 195 hotels

  • 50 hotels

  • 22 hotels

326 hotels in this place

Bangalore, now known officially as Bengaluru , is the capital of the Indian state of Karnataka.

Interesting places:

  • Lalbagh Botanical Gardens
  • Vidhana Soudha
  • UB City
  • Government Museum
  • Cubbon Park
  • 4 hotels

  • 8 hotels

  • 80 hotels

  • 119 hotels

  • 29 hotels

  • 24 hotels

264 hotels in this place

Mumbai (state tourism office), a cosmopolitan metropolis, earlier known as Bombay, is the largest city in India and the capital of the state Maharashtra. Mumbai was originally a conglomeration of seven islands on the Konkan coastline which over time were joined to form the island city of Bombay. The island ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Gateway of India
  • National Gallery of Modern Art
  • Jehangir Art Gallery
  • Rajabai Tower
  • Eros Theater
  • 3 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 53 hotels

  • 108 hotels

  • 29 hotels

  • 11 hotels

205 hotels in this place

Chennai , formerly known as Madras, is the capital of the southern state of Tamil Nadu in India. With a population of 8.6 million (2011 census), Chennai's urbanized area is the most populous in South India and the fourth most populous in India. It is situated on the east coast of peninsular India. Though ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Marina Beach
  • St. Andrew\'s Kirk
  • Parthasarathy Temple
  • Mount Road
  • Armenian Church
  • 8 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 27 hotels

  • 97 hotels

  • 30 hotels

  • 9 hotels

171 hotels in this place

Jaipur, (also known as the Pink City), is the capital of Rajasthan in India.

Interesting places:

  • Amber Palace
  • City Palace
  • Jantar Mantar
  • Hawa Mahal
  • Amber Fort
  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 23 hotels

  • 77 hotels

  • 18 hotels

  • 11 hotels

130 hotels in this place

Hyderabad, the pearl city of India, is the capital of Andhra Pradesh in Southern India, located on the banks of the Musi River and on the Deccan Plateau. Hyderabad and Secunderabad are "twin cities" near Hussain Sagar Lake (also known as Tank Bund in local parlance) but both cities have grown so much that now ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Golconda Fort
  • Lumbini Park
  • Charminar
  • Mecca Masjid
  • Chowmahalla Palace
  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 10 hotels

  • 73 hotels

  • 31 hotels

  • 9 hotels

124 hotels in this place

Gurgaon is a suburban city of Delhi, just across the state line in Haryana.

Interesting places:

  • DLF Cyber City
  • Select CITYWALK
  • Sultanpur Bird Sanctuary
  • Leisure Valley
  • Kingdom of Dreams
  • 1 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 41 hotels

  • 49 hotels

  • 20 hotels

  • 5 hotels

117 hotels in this place

Kolkata (formerly Calcutta) is the capital of West Bengal and one of the largest urban agglomerations in India. It is the largest city in Eastern India, as well as in the historical region of Bengal (today's West Bengal and Bangladesh. Kolkata is an 'in your face' city that shocks and charms the unsuspecting ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Victoria Memorial
  • Armenian Ghat
  • Academy of Fine Arts
  • St. Paul\'s Cathedral
  • Howrah Bridge
  • 5 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 24 hotels

  • 63 hotels

  • 14 hotels

  • 4 hotels

110 hotels in this place

Kochi is a cosmopolitan city in Kerala with a bustling commercial port. Kochi is the financial capital of Kerala and, with a population of more than 2 million, the biggest urban agglomeration in the state.

Interesting places:

  • St. Francis Church
  • Chinese Fishing Nets
  • Santa Cruz Cathedral
  • Durbar Hall Art Gallery
  • Mattancherry Palace
  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 12 hotels

  • 65 hotels

  • 22 hotels

  • 5 hotels

106 hotels in this place

Pune is in Maharashtra, India. It is considered the state's cultural capital and is the second largest city in the state. Well known for educational tourism, comes along with nice blend of cultural, business, health, cuisine tourism with backdrop of its own unique traditions mixed with modernism and ... (read more)

Interesting places:

  • Saras Baug
  • Shaniwar Wada
  • Nehru Stadium
  • Phoenix Market City
  • Aga Khan Palace
panoramio Photos are copyrighted by their owners

States in India

  • 12 hotels

  • 8 hotels

  • 127 hotels

  • 336 hotels

  • 95 hotels

  • 32 hotels

610 hotels in this place

  • 1 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 100 hotels

  • 358 hotels

  • 94 hotels

  • 33 hotels

587 hotels in this place

  • 6 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 84 hotels

  • 340 hotels

  • 71 hotels

  • 12 hotels

513 hotels in this place

Goa

  • 6 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 173 hotels

  • 262 hotels

  • 53 hotels

  • 11 hotels

507 hotels in this place

  • 35 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 64 hotels

  • 267 hotels

  • 79 hotels

  • 22 hotels

469 hotels in this place

  • 3 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 84 hotels

  • 293 hotels

  • 40 hotels

  • 28 hotels

449 hotels in this place

Popular cities:

  • 3 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 69 hotels

  • 156 hotels

  • 40 hotels

  • 13 hotels

282 hotels in this place

  • 1 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 49 hotels

  • 127 hotels

  • 24 hotels

  • 9 hotels

212 hotels in this place

Popular cities:

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 41 hotels

  • 110 hotels

  • 28 hotels

  • 2 hotels

182 hotels in this place

  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 41 hotels

  • 109 hotels

  • 18 hotels

  • 2 hotels

172 hotels in this place

  • 1 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 53 hotels

  • 63 hotels

  • 23 hotels

  • 5 hotels

146 hotels in this place

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 12 hotels

  • 79 hotels

  • 39 hotels

  • 11 hotels

142 hotels in this place

  • 4 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 32 hotels

  • 76 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 2 hotels

118 hotels in this place

Popular cities:

  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 12 hotels

  • 68 hotels

  • 27 hotels

  • 4 hotels

113 hotels in this place

Popular cities:

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 9 hotels

  • 46 hotels

  • 23 hotels

  • 0 hotels

79 hotels in this place

  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 12 hotels

  • 25 hotels

  • 10 hotels

  • 1 hotels

50 hotels in this place

Popular cities:

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 9 hotels

  • 19 hotels

  • 8 hotels

  • 1 hotels

37 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 5 hotels

  • 24 hotels

  • 5 hotels

  • 2 hotels

36 hotels in this place

Popular cities:

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 9 hotels

  • 16 hotels

  • 7 hotels

  • 2 hotels

35 hotels in this place

Popular cities:

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 7 hotels

  • 18 hotels

  • 5 hotels

  • 0 hotels

30 hotels in this place

Popular cities:

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 5 hotels

  • 20 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 0 hotels

28 hotels in this place

Popular cities:

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 5 hotels

  • 15 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

20 hotels in this place

Popular cities:

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 10 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

14 hotels in this place

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 8 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

13 hotels in this place

Popular cities:

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 3 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 5 hotels

  • 0 hotels

12 hotels in this place

Popular cities:

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

7 hotels in this place

Popular cities:

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 4 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

6 hotels in this place

Popular cities:

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

1 hotels in this place

Popular cities:

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

0 hotels in this place

Popular cities:

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

0 hotels in this place

Popular cities:

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

0 hotels in this place

Popular cities:

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

0 hotels in this place

Popular cities:

panoramio Photos are copyrighted by their owners

Points of Interest in India

If you really want to see all the worth visiting places in India, one tourist visa of six months can be argued to be considered enough. There are more tourist destinations in India than can be mentioned in one book. Almost every State in India has over ten major tourist destinations and there are cities which can not be fully experienced even in one full week. Not to forget that several states of India are bigger than most of the countries in the world and there are twenty-eight states in India.

  • The Taj Mahal: The Taj Mahal is widely recognized as the jewel of Muslim art in India and one of the universally admired masterpieces of the world's heritage".It is actually bigger and more majestic than what it looks in the photograph.
  • Agra: A majestic city, containing historical monuments such as the majestic Agra Fort and the beautiful Taj Mahal.
  • Delhi: The Capital and the heart of India; it is both modern and historical. Having monuments such as the Red Fort and Qutub Minar, it also provides modern facilities to its visitors. Delhi also hosted 2010 Commonwealth Games, and is less polluted than most ares of India.
  • Varanasi : Hindu religious rituals, some harking back to the Vedic age, 5,000 years ago, Varanasi is the oldest living city of the world and the birthplace of Hinduism. Don't miss the evening Ganga Aarti.
  • Tigers, Remember that you will need a lot of luck to see a Tiger,but your chances of seeing a tiger are fairly good in Bandhavgarh or Ranthambore tiger reserves.
  • Asiatic Lions at The Gir Forest National Park and Wildlife Sanctuary (also known as Sasan-Gir, ગીર રાષ્ટ્રીય ઉદ્યાન) in the state of Gujarat is the sole home of the pure Asiatic Lions. Buses and jeeps are available for touring the sanctuary.
  • Gandhi Ashram Located in Ahmedabad and was once the house of Mahatma Gandhi. Founded by Mahatma Gandhi in 1915 it lies on the tranquil stretch of the Sabarmati river and was referred to as the Satyagraha Ashram during the lifetime of the Mahatma. Mahatma began his famous 'Dandi March' in 1930 to protest against the Salt Tax imposed by the British. One can see the three wise monkeys and many more of Gandhiji's teachings at the ashram premises. The ashram today continues the work started by Mahatma and houses a handicrafts centre, a handmade paper factory and a spinning wheel factory.
  • Sundarbans. Largest mangrove forest and delta in the world. Home to the famous Royal Bengal tigers and estuarine crocodiles.
  • Hill Stations. India is home to some remarkable, scenic and gorgeous hill stations such as Shimla, Coorg, Mussorie, Darjeeling, Nainital, Almora, Shillong,Mt.Abu and Ooty.
  • Sangla Valley. Considered one of the most beautiful valleys of the world lies in the upper regions of Himachal Pradesh. It is extremely scenic with photogenic landscapes and unforgettable landscapes.
  • Leh. Considered to be on the top of the world. One of the highest inhabited cities of the world. It gives a different idea of high altitude altogether with unbelievable landscapes.
  • Srinagar. It is the capital of the State of Jammu and Kashmir in winter season. Extremely beautiful city in the midst of the Himalayas with a very beautiful Dal lake in it.
  • Jammu. It is the capital of the State of Jammu and Kashmir in summer season. Jammu city is also known as "City ofTemples" as it has many temples and shrines like vashno devi.
  • Gangtok. Capital city of Sikkim. Gangtok is a bewitching hill-station located amidst the multiple-hued mountains of Sikkim.
  • Goa. Ruled by Portuguese for over 400 years, Goa is a cocktail of Indian and Portuguese culture. Quite a different kind of place altogether, Goa is full of beautiful beaches and flocking tourists.
  • Pondicherry. Pondicherry was a French colony over two hundred years and has a lot of sighting of French influence throughout its territories. Now tourists often flock there for spiritual ashrams or enjoyable pubs and parties.
  • Bishnupur. Located in West Bengal, it is home to the famous terracotta temples and a great centre for classical Bishnupur Gharana music. Do not forget to buy a Bankura horse made of terracota(which is the symbol for Indian handicrafts).
  • Tirupati Balaji. If you want to see the material richness of a religious place, visit this temple. It is considered to be the richest temple in the world and one surprising sight to see for a non Indian. It is located in Andhra Pradesh.
  • Nalanda. Related to Buddhism, It was the oldest university of the world later on destroyed completely during the Muslim invasions of India. Sights of Buddhist interest like Pavapuri and Rajgir are in the vicinity.
  • Golden Temple. An actual temple plated with gold is one of Sikhism's holiest shrines. Looks very serene early in the mornings.
  • Khajuraho. Supposedly the birthplace of Kamasutra, Khajuraho is full of temples with erotic sculptures all around them. One of the most interesting and less talked about aspects of Hindu culture.
  • Kochi. In a State full of secluded and ravishing beaches, Kochi is one of the most sought after tourist destination. It is advisable to visit the surrounding beach cities of Kochi. Don't forget to experience backwaters of Kerala in a house boat.
  • Andamans. Beautiful Island territory of India in the Bay of Bengal, Andaman islands can be considered one of the best island destinations in the world.
  • Jaisalmer. A city located in the middle of desert, Jaisalmer is a place to go for watching the beautiful view of sun lighted virgin deserts of Thar Desert.

Sports

  • Cricket. India is a cricket-obsessed country and cricket is in the blood of most Indians. India plays an important role in world cricket and has been world champion twice in the ICC Cricket World Cup, in 1983 beating the mighty West Indies in the final and most recently in 2011 defeating Sri Lanka. India also emerged triumphant in the inaugural ICC T20 World Cup in 2007 held in South Africa beating arch-rival Pakistan in a nail-biting final. The popularity of cricket in India is second to no other game, so seeing kids playing cricket in parks and alleys with rubber balls and makeshift wickets is extremely common. Until 2008, Indian cricket was all about the national team playing against other countries in one-day matches or epic 5 day Test marathons, but the advent of the Indian Premier League (IPL) [43] has, for better or worse, brought fast-paced, commercialized "Twenty20" cricket to the fore, complete with cheerleaders and massive salaries. In international matches, while Australia and South Africa make viable opposition, the biggest rivalry by far is with neighbouring Pakistan, and matches between the two sides are often a very charged affair. About half-a dozen Indian stadiums have a capacity of over 45,000 and watching a cricket match can be quite an experience. Eden Gardens cricket stadium in Kolkata is Asia's highest capacity stadium with over 90,000 seating capacity and is the oldest cricket stadium in the Indian Subcontinent established in 1865 and is comparable to the stadiums of Lords' in London and the MCG in Melbourne. The atmosphere of most matches is electrifying. Nearly all international matches have sellout crowds, and it is quite normal for fans to bribe officials and make their way in. Starting ticket prices are quite cheap; they can be as low as ₹250-300. India and Pakistan are all-time arch rivals, and cricket matches between the two nations attract up to a billion TV viewers.
  • Football. Other than cricket, you can come across young boys playing around with a ball on any open space which is available.

Club soccer is more popular with Indians than international games and you will find people getting into heated arguments in public places over their favorite teams. Also, many large restaurants and bars offer a view of important European club matches and the World Cup matches.The most famous and electrifying Derby club match is between Mohun Bagan Athletic club (Estd.-1889) and East Bengal Football club (Estd.-1920) held in Salt Lake stadium (the second largest non-auto racing stadium in the world) in Kolkata, the football capital of India and a tremendously football crazy city.

  • Hockey (Field hockey). Despite the craze for cricket and football, the national game of India, hockey, retains a prominent position in the hearts of many Indians. Although the viewership has dwindled significantly, (as compared to the golden era before cricket came to the fore in the mid 80's), it hasn't vanished completely.

Especially in North India, some eastern parts like Jharkhand, Odisha and the Northeastern states, hockey still has a significant fan base. The introduction of the Premier Hockey League has helped recover its popularity in recent times.

  • Formula One. Formula One has not historically been very popular in India, but recently has become much more popular. People now know the names of drivers such as Sebastian Vettel and Fernando Alonso, while ten years earlier only a few knew this sport. One can enjoy Formula One at Noida, where the Airtel Indian Grand Prix is held every year during the last week of October.

Taj Mahal - Agra

City Palace - Udaipur

Dasaswamedh ghat - Varanasi

Gateway of India - Mumbai

Jaisalmer Fort - Jaisalmer

Amber Palace - Jaipur

St. Francis Church - Cochin

Gandhi Mandapam - Kanyakumari

Humayun\'s Tomb - New Delhi

Victoria Memorial - Kolkata

Pushkar Lake - Ajmer

Mehrangarh Fort - Jodhpur

Lalbagh Botanical Gardens - Bengaluru

Golden Temple - Amritsar

Khajuraho Temples - Khajuraho

Lakshman Jhula - Rishikesh

Arjuna\'s Penance - Mahabalipuram

Maharaja\'s Palace - Mysore

Old Goa - Goa Velha

Meenakshi Amman Temple - Madurai

panoramio Photos are copyrighted by their owners
loading...

Loading...