Swaziland

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 8 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 1 hotels

14 hotels in this place

Swaziland is a country in Southern Africa, landlocked by South Africa in its west and Mozambique in the east. Swaziland's absolute monarchy is one of the oldest in Africa.

Population: 1,403,362 people
Area: 17,364 km2
Highest point: 1,862 m
Coastline: 0 km
Life expectancy: 50.01 years
GDP per capita: $5,900
Sort by:

No rooms are available for given criteria.

Sort by:

Interactive map

interactive map

Welcome to our interactive map!

Accommodation

Room 1:
Child age:

Filter the result


Legend

Hotels

  • 5 star hotels 5 star hotel
  • 4 star hotels 4 star hotel
  • 3 star hotels 3 star hotel
  • 2 star hotels 2 star hotel
  • 1 star hotels 1 star hotel

Cities

  • Metropolis over 100 hotels
  • Big city 50-100 hotels
  • Medium city 20-50 hotels
  • Small city 5-20 hotels
  • Village below 5 hotels

Points of Interest

  • Beach Beach
  • Business object Business object
  • Casino Casino
  • Civic property Civic property
  • Education Education
  • Entertainment Entertainment
  • Golf course Golf course
  • Green space Green space
  • Harbor Harbor
  • Historic site Historic site
  • Interesting place Interesting place
  • Medical Medical
  • Monument Monument
  • Museum Museum
  • Shopping Shopping
  • Skiing Skiing
  • Sports facility Sports facility
  • Theater Theater
  • Winery Winery

About Swaziland

History

Artifacts indicating human activity dating back to the early Stone Age 200,000 years ago have been found in the Kingdom of Swaziland. Prehistoric rock art paintings date from ca. 25,000 B.C. The earliest inhabitants of the area were Khoisan hunter-gatherers. They were largely replaced by the Bantu tribes during Bantu migrations who hailed from the Great Lakes regions of Eastern Africa.

The autonomy of the Swaziland Nation was dictated by British rule of southern Africa in the 19th and 20th centuries. In 1881 the British government signed a convention recognizing Swazi independence. At the start of the Anglo Boer war, Britain placed Swaziland under its direct jurisdiction as a Protectorate. The Swaziland independence Constitution was promulgated by Britain in November 1963 in terms of which a legislative Council and an Executive Council were established. The first Legislative Council of Swaziland was constituted on 9 September 1964. Changes to the original constitution proposed by the Legislative Council were accepted by Britain and a new Constitution providing for a House of Assembly and Senate was drawn up. Elections under this Constitution were held in 1967. Since 1973, Swaziland has seen a rather quiet struggle between pro-multiparty activists and the monarchy. It gained independence from UK in 1968.

Climate

Generally speaking, rain falls mostly during the summer months, often in the form of thunderstorms. Winter is the dry season. Annual rainfall is highest on the Highveld in the West, between 1000 and 2000mm depending on the year. The further East, the less rain, with the Lowveld recording 500 to 900mm per annum. Variations in temperature are also related to the altitude of the different regions. The Highveld temperature is temperate and, seldom, uncomfortably hot while the Lowveld may record temperatures around 40 degrees in summer.

Food

Many Western foods are available in Swazi grocery stores, but traditional foods are still common, as is modern convenient food based on traditional ingredients.

Maize-based dishes are popular, and mealie or pap (similar to porridge) is a staple. Beans, groundnuts, pumpkin, avocado and sour milk are also common ingredients. Dried and cooked local meats, such as antelope (often called 'wild meat' by locals), are widely available at tourist restaurants.

"Chicken dust" is a cheap local bbq meal; basically chicken grilled in the open served with a salad and mealie. It is popular both with locals and absolutely delicious. Of course, take appropriate precautions as it is a street vendor food.

Sweet breads, vegetables and fruits are often available from roadside merchants. If you're craving pasta, imported olive oil, Nestle chocolate, Herbal Essences and Carlsberg, head over to the Hub, at Manzini: a huge Spar with everything you could need (at an appropriately inflated price). There are several coffee-shops and restaurants around the Hub, also: be aware that the lavatories are located separately, down the stairs, and you have to pay to use them. Manzini's bustling markets and local shops yield all kinds of interesting foodstuffs, along with the ubiquitous KFC.

Drinks

Marula is locally brewed during the marula season. It may be difficult to find; ask locals as it is home-brewed.

There is a vibrant nightlife in Swaziland ranging from traditional dances to bars and nightclubs. If you're staying in Ezulwini, there are four bars at the Royal Swazi hotel; why not check out the Why Not nightclub too? If you're in the Malkerns area, the House on Fire is extremely popular: local art, local and national DJs, an open-air setting and live acts.

Shopping

SZL, the currency of Swaziland called the lilangeni (plural: "emalangeni"), is tied to the South African rand at par. Shops in Swaziland usually accept and make change for both currencies indiscriminately where banknotes are concerned, but not coins. However, this is not the case in South Africa, so if you are planning to visit South Africa also, you may prefer to request rand in exchange for emalangeni at banks in Mbabane or Manzini: proof of identity is required. It is impossible to exchange your emalangeni at Johannesburg Airport, as well as in the UK. All Swazi vendors will take Rand, but no South African vendors will take emalangeni.

When travelling on the kombis in Swaziland, the operators will NOT take Rand coins.

Shopping

There are smaller stores, where you can buy everything from Swazi Foods to Swazi wooden sculptures and handmade bags.

This article is based on Creative Commons Attribution/Share-Alike 3.0 Licensed text from the article Swaziland on Wikivoyage.

Cities in Swaziland

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 5 hotels

  • 2 hotels

  • 1 hotels

8 hotels in this place

Mbabane is the capital of Swaziland.

Interesting places:

  • Somholo National Stadium
  • Waterford Kamhlaba United World College
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

2 hotels in this place

Manzini is the second biggest city in Swaziland and the major business centre.

Interesting places:

  • Hlane Royal National Park
  • Mkhaya Game Reserve
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 1 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

1 hotels in this place

Interesting places:

  • Malolotja Nature Reserve
  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

  • 0 hotels

0 hotels in this place

Interesting places:

  • Maguga Dam
panoramio Photos are copyrighted by their owners

Points of Interest in Swaziland

The national parks and reserves are the most important sights in Swaziland and traditional culture and customs are still alive - just like in most of Africa.

Hlane Royal National Park - Manzini

Maguga Dam - Piggs Peak

Malolotja Nature Reserve - Motshane

Mkhaya Game Reserve - Manzini

panoramio Photos are copyrighted by their owners
loading...

Loading...